Wi-Fi

Bizarre pornography raid underscores Wi-Fi privacy risks

"Lying on his family room floor with assault weapons trained on him, shouts of "pedophile!" and "pornographer!" stinging like his fresh cuts and bruises, the Buffalo homeowner didn't need long to figure out the reason for the early morning wake-up call from a swarm of federal agents. That new wireless router. He'd gotten fed up trying to set a password. Someone must have used his Internet connection, he thought."

New Frequency Set to Turbocharge Wi-Fi

Wi-Fi is about to lay claim to a new frequency band that could result in speeds at least 10 times faster than what’s currently available.

An agreement between the Wi-Fi Alliance and the Wireless Gigabit Alliance will let the Wi-Fi Alliance carve out specs and standards to support Wi-Fi operation in the 60-GHz frequency band in a bid to make Wi-Fi faster. By contrast, Wi-Fi today operates in the 2.4-GHz and 5- GHz bands.

Wi-Fi key-cracking kits sold in China

Dodgy salesmen in China are making money from long-known weaknesses in a Wi-Fi encryption standard, by selling network key-cracking kits for the average user.

Wi-Fi USB adapters bundled with a Linux operating system, key-breaking software and a detailed instruction book are being sold online and at China's bustling electronics bazaars. The kits, pitched as a way for users to surf the Web for free, have drawn enough buyers and attention that one Chinese auction site, Taobao.com, had to ban their sale last year.

McDonald's to Offer Free Wi-Fi, Starbucks Beware?

McDonald's will offer customers free Wi-Fi come January, according to reports. Coupling Wi-Fi with its new coffee offerings, will the Golden Arches steal some green from Starbucks? Verizon says it is also now offering free Wi-Fi to some subscribers.

Not even the Dollar Menu can top this deal. Beginning in January 2010, McDonald's will offer its in-store Wi-Fi service for free, according to reporting from Wi-Fi Net News.

802.11n Wi-Fi standard finally approved

As predicted last month, the IEEE has finally approved the 802.11n high-throughput wireless LAN standard.

Finalization of the new wireless networking standard--which is capable of delivering throughput speeds up to 300 megabits per second (and even higher)--took exactly seven years from the day it was conceived, or six years from the first draft version. The standard has been through a dozen or so draft versions.

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