Trolls

Trolls are sadists and psychos

"A new study carried out in Canada has revealed what most internet junkies knew already – trolls are sick.

The study found that one in twenty internet users deliberately engage in trolling. They exhibit classic traits of sadism, psychopathy, narcissism and Machievellianism. The study was published in ScienceDirect and it covered 1,215 people.

Unsurprisingly it found that those who identified themselves as trolls were sadistic, as they enjoyed to watching their victims suffer. They were also willing to manipulate people and many simply lacked empathy."

Social networking makes us ruder

"Too much gear for collaboration, social networking and communication tools is making people ruder, according to a new survey from some ginks working for a “social email provider” harmon.ie. The study found that during face-to-face meetings, 41 per cent of UK workers remain glued to their communication devices, sending instant messages, responding to texts, listening to voicemails or checking their emails. This figure rises to a staggering 70 percent during virtual meetings and webcasts.

How the internet created an age of rage

"The worldwide web has made critics of us all. But with commenters able to hide behind a cloak of anonymity, the blog and chatroom have become forums for hatred and bile..."

Patent Trolls Are Thriving

This week, our colleague Joe Mullin, who writes the Patent Litigation Weekly for IP Law and Business, guides readers through a new PricewaterhouseCoopers study on patent litigation. What grabbed Mullins's attention was the significant role played by "non-practicing entities," the polite term for patent trolls. (Patent trolls are entities that bring or threaten litigation to enforce patent rights, without any intention of making or marketing the product at issue.) "Patent trolls aren't just surviving, they're thriving," Mullin observes.

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