Money

Nintendo Hijacks Ad Revenue From Fan-Created YouTube Playthroughs

The BBC reports that Nintendo is now using the content ID match feature in YouTube to identify screencap videos of people playing their games. They then take over the advertising that appears with the video, and thus the ad revenue.

The Poor Waste More Time On Digital Entertainment

"Children of parents with low social status are less able to resist the temptations of technological entertainment, a fact that impedes their education and adds to the obstacles such children face in obtaining financial comfort later in life. As explained in the article, poor parents and their children often waste both their time and money on heavily marketed entertainment systems.

Google Increases Bug Award to $20,000

"The company said that it will now award $20,000 for any bug that allows code execution on its "production systems". Google will also pay $10,000 for SQL injection bugs as well as for "certain types" of information disclosure, authentication, and authorization bypass bugs. The previous top reward of $3,133.70 now applies to "many types of XSS, XSRF, and other high-impact flaws in highly sensitive applications."

Two Chinese crackers call for code of conduct

"Two Chinese crackers have released a code of conduct calling for the rejection of cybertheft. Gong Wei and Wan Tao, released their "Hackers' Self-Discipline Convention" to the Chinese press and posted it onto the world wide wibble. The document is a moral code that outlines appropriate hacking activities. According to the document, hackers should not obtain money through stealing from the public. Hacking groups will also not spread tools that are meant to take income. It also calls for the public's privacy, especially that of children and minors, should be protected.

Microsoft to Pay $200,000 for Innovative Defense Technology in Blue Hat Prize Program

"In the face of mounting external pressure to begin paying bug bounties, Microsoft is instead launching a new program that will pay a $200,000 top prize to a security researcher who develops the most innovative defensive security technology. The program is designed to "inspire researchers to focus their talents on defensive technologies," the company said.

Movie industry buries report proving pirates are great consumers

"GfK Group is one of the largest market research companies in the world and is often used by the movie industry to carry out research and studies into piracy. Talking to a source within GfK who wished to remain anonymous, Telepolis found that a recent study looking at pirates and their purchasing activities found them to be almost the complete opposite of the criminal parasites the entertainment industry want them to be.

PayPal Predicts The End of the Wallet By 2015

"As new technology emerges, one can safely assume that the days of carrying a wallet will soon end. In fact, PayPal believes that by the year 2015, no one will be carrying a wallet anymore. Instead, mobile payment methods will be taking over."

Google Offering $20K for Chrome Pwn2Own Hack

"CanSecWest takes place on March 9 and as usual, there’ll be the annual Pwn2Own hacking contest. However, this year there’s a new platform on the block -- Google’s Chrome OS -- and the search giant is happy to encourage participants to give it all they’ve got. ZDNet reports that Mountain View is offering a prize of $20,000 for the first person to crack its Chrome OS notebook via a vulnerability and sandbox escape in the Chrome browser."

Microsoft VP Bottles the Scent of Money

"Ah, the smell of a crisp, new bank note. Is there anything better? Probably, but can you get the scent of clean babies, freshly fallen rain, wet leaves, or sunshine in a bottle? Taking a little time out from his work as VP of Sales for Microsoft, Chicago-born Patrick McCarthy is marketing a new cologne that he believes will make people feel more confident. Now, as a woman who wears perfume every day, I can tell you that certain fragrances make you feel more bold and confident than others.

Canada wants unedited "Money for Nothing" back on the radio

"Canada's official telecommunications regulatory agency is unhappy about the Canadian Broadcast Standards Council's recent decision that the unedited version of the Dire Straits song "Money for Nothing" is "unacceptable for broadcast." The CBSC, which represents 760 private Canadian radio/television license owners, made that call earlier this month in response to a complaint that the tune includes three references to an offensive word."
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