Microsoft

The Microsoft-Yahoo Deal

Microsoft and Yahoo, I now pronounce you husband and wife.

Yes, my fellow witnesses, the moment has arrived; the on-again, off-again courtship that dragged out for approximately 7,432 years has finally reached its climax.

Microsoft Yahoo Search DealMicrosoft and Yahoo announced on Thursday they'd gotten the go-ahead to complete their long-discussed search partnership. Both the U.S.

Microsoft wins WGA case

Judge chucks the case out

A lawsuit that accused Microsoft of misleading consumers to download and install an update for Windows Genuine Advantage (WGA) under the guise that it was critical security update, has been thrown out of court.

The case was already getting shaky. A federal judge refused to certify the lawsuit as a class action, which would have meant anyone who owned a Windows XP PC in mid-2006 could join the case without having to hire a lawyer.

The plaintiffs and Microsoft agreed to drop the lawsuit and now the Judge has officially thrown it out anyway.

Microsoft's Game Room: The Arcade, Reborn?

With the Game Room, Microsoft's hoping to capture the old magic of video game arcades, minus the stale air, sugar highs, and wasted quarters.

I got some questions answered on service, which will be available on Windows and Xbox Live this spring. Here are the important details (if you're a retro game nerd):

-30 games will be available at launch, including Centipede, Lunar Lander, and Night Driver (full list here), from arcade systems as well as the Atari 2600 and Intellivision. Microsoft says it'll release 7 new games per week after launch.

EU lets Microsoft of the hook

The European Commission has buried the hatchet with Microsoft after Redmond agreed to offer European consumers the choice of alternative browsers in Windows. In turn, the EC agreed to drop charges filed against Microsoft back in January.

Microsoft fined for using `money power'

NEW DELHI: It's a capital cost all right! Delhi High Court has asked Microsoft Corporation to shell out Rs 800,000 ($16,000) for choosing to
fight four copyright violation cases in the Indian capital even though they originated in other cities.

The order came after the court found that the alleged violations occurred in Bangalore, Hyderabad, Chandigarh and Mumbai.

Not only did the court note that Microsoft had offices in these cities, but it also said the company was using "money power" to "harass" the defendants, who would have to travel to Delhi to fight the cases.

Microsoft's IE 9 to get GPU acceleration

The next version of Internet Explorer will gain speed by off-loading as much as it can way from the browser and onto the machine. IE9 will speed up the browser's overall performance by sending image and text rendering chores to the PC's graphic processor.

The idea to use a computer's graphics processor unit (GPU) to accelerate their browsers is also being looked at by Mozilla, which makes Firefox, and Norwegian developer Opera. Steven Sinofsky, Microsoft's president of Windows and Windows Live, said that early work on IE9 had already shown significant performance strides.

 
 
 

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Microsoft goes Open Source (OSI-Approved)!

Microsoft already had its own open source (OSI-approved) licenses, its own open source project hosting site and now it's adding its own non-profit open source foundation. That's right, the company that is still banging the patent drum against open source now has its own 501(c)(6) open source foundation. Officially called the CodePlex Foundation, it's a separate effort from the CodePlex site and is aimed at helping to get more commercial developers involved in open source. Considering how they continue to attack Linux and open source, will anyone take them seriously?

Microsoft Word Ban: Maybe it Wouldn't be so Bad

It looks like Microsoft has the advantage -- at least for now -- in its David vs. Goliath legal skirmish with Canadian software developer i4i, which recently won a patent infringement suit against the software giant.

Microsoft apologizes for changing race in photo

Software giant Microsoft Corp. is apologizing for altering a photo on its Web site to change the race of one of the people shown in the picture.

A photo on the Seattle-based company's U.S. Web site shows two men, one Asian and one black, and a white woman seated at a conference room table. But on the Web site of Microsoft's Polish business unit, the black man's head has been replaced with that of a white man. The color of his hand remains unchanged.

The photo editing sparked criticism online. Some bloggers said Poland's ethnic homogeneity may have played a role in changing the photo.

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