IT

IT managers stressed out of their minds

"Nearly two thirds of IT managers are so stressed that they are thinking of packing it all and joining a new age commune where they can be calm. GFI Software today announced the results of its new IT Admin Stress Survey, which found that 69% of IT administrators have considered switching careers due to job stress. Apparently dealing with managers, end users, and tight deadlines were cited as the biggest contributors to work-related stress.

IT workers fat and don't get enough sex

"Male IT workers are more likely to be fat and not get enough sex, according to a new survey compiled by the Men's Health Network and Cephalon. Those who work non-traditional hours including IT professionals working overnight shifts, report that these shifts can negatively impact their health. More than 79 per cent of shift workers believe that they are negatively impacted by their shift work and voiced daily concern over their energy level and weight. A third felt that work was stuffing up their sex lives."

Security fail: When trusted IT people go bad

"You investigate and find that not only is your software illegal, it was sold to you by a company secretly owned and operated by none other than your own IT systems administrator, a trusted employee for seven years. When you start digging into the admin's activities, you find a for-pay porn Web site he's been running on one of your corporate servers. Then you find that he's downloaded 400 customer credit card numbers from your e-commerce server." | more

Hippie Engineering meets modern IT

"Tourists visiting Newcastle upon Tyne are more likely to pack a warm wool sweater than a beach blanket. In northern England, swimsuit season brings summer rains and chilly temperatures. Yet according to the Palo Alto, CA-based Hewlett-Packard, you won't find a better spot for a data center.

"The cool location is very attractive. We will probably only run the auxiliary cooling devices three days a year," says Ed Kettler, a fellow at Hewlett-Packard (HP).

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