Intel meets its match in IBM

There are few, if any, microprocessor manufacturers equal to Intel. IBM, however, is a very large exception.
Power7 wafer: Like Intel, IBM manufactures its own processors, something few 'chipmakers' do these days.

By the time Intel had introduced its latest processor for servers, the Itanium 9300, on Monday, IBM had already stolen Intel's thunder with its new Power7 chip technology, announced earlier in the morning.

And rightfully so: the Power7 is impressive. It has eight cores, while Intel's Itanium 9300 (PDF) has four.



Big Game (aka, Super Bowl) Tech Ads

"This Sunday the Super Bowl is once again upon us, and that means one thing: great advertising. (Apparently some sort of game will be going on too, but many of us tune in not for the touchdowns but for the commercials.) And it's not all beer and car ads; technology companies have a long and illustrious history as Super Bowl advertisers."

Btw: Intel is an advertiser this year with on sad pand... I mean, robot...

Intel talks Westmere, 48-core monster

Intel has been briefing folks on Westmere, the company's 32nm shrink of the Nehalem architecture, under NDA for some time now. But the big public reveal comes in a Monday session. Westmere is actually more than a straight shrink of Nehalem from 45nm to 32nm—it brings some new features and instructions, all of which Intel will detail in this session.

Note that Intel recently launched the first round of its Westmere products, in the form of the desktop-oriented Clarksdale and the mobile-oriented Arrandale chips.

Intel Clarkdale Linux Graphics Performance

"Last week we delivered our first Linux benchmarks of Intel's Core i3 Clarkdale processor with a variety of computational tests through the Phoronix Test Suite. While the Core i3 packs a nice performance punch, that is not all it has to offer. Also found on the Clarkdale (and mobile Arrandale) processors is an integrated 45nm graphics processor that is supposed to offer a decent level of performance in comparison to earlier Intel IGPs normally found on the motherboard's Chipset.

Intel Clarkdale CPU With IGP Enabled

"Since the launch of the new CPUs from Intel, nicknamed Clarkdale, we have seen a fair share of overclocking attempts; some people even breaking world records, pushing the a Clarkdale over 7Ghz. We have read reports from overclockers who had issues with pushing the BCLK higher when the IGP was enabled. In this article we will explore possible solutions to help circumvent this limit, so you can enjoy high BCLK while using the IGP."

Intel releases new network adapter

Intel has lifted the wrappers on a 10GBase-t network adapter which sports a pair of 10 Gigabit Ethernet ports. The X52-T2 adapter would be the first to have two ports on a single adapter.

Designed for servers, the PCI-Express card will support connection distances of up to 100 meters. In its press release Intel said that by placing a pair of ports on the card, administrators will have a redundant connection in case anything went bang.

It means that administrators can pair the connections to create a single pipeline running at 20GbE speeds.

Intel calls for cheaper hardware

Intel claims that it is trying to reduce the cost of computers so that more people can afford them. (We already have those, but they are powered by AMD chips.

Intel's Otellini Talks Up 'Westmere' Chips, WiDi

Intel on Thursday officially unveiled its new, 32-nanometer family of processors at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) here, including the Core i7, i5, and i3 processors, the Intel 5 Series chipsets, and Intel Centrino Wi-Fi and Wimax adapters.

Intel chief executive Paul Otellini took the stage at a CES keynote to discuss how computing is no longer confined to the PC and is becoming increasingly mobile – an advance made possible via Intel processors, of course.

Intel chips to reach 15GHz by 2010

At the Intel Developer Forum in Tokyo, Intel CTO Pat Gelsinger stated that by 2010 Intel CPUs will run at up to 15GHz. These processors will contain a billion transistors. Didn't Intel claim at the most recent Intel Developer Forum that they would put 10 billion transistors on a chip by 2010? At that time, PDAs may run at up to 5GHz. Intel now has stated that the upcoming Prescott processor will scale to 5GHz, and that the successor chip should scale to 6GHz. Presumably, both chips would be based on the modified Pentium 4 core introduced in 2000.

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