hackers

Hacker Who Leaked Nude Scarlett Johansson Photos Gets 10 Years in Prison

"Chris Chaney pleads guilty to hacking over 50 celebrities' smartphones for fun and profit

Between November 2010 and October 2011, there were a rash of hacking of high-profile celebrities smartphones. Starlets like Scarlett Johansson, Christina Aguilera, Mila Kunis had sexually explicit or provocative pictures stolen from their devices and released onto the internet.

Skype users targeted by malicious worm that locks them out of their PCs

"Security researchers have detected a new malware campaign that attempts to infect Skype users by sending them booby-trapped links from contacts in their address book.

DSL modem hack used to infect millions with banking fraud malware

"Millions of Internet users in Brazil have fallen victim to a sustained attack that exploited vulnerabilities in DSL modems, forcing people visiting sites such as Google or Facebook to reach imposter sites that installed malicious software and stole online banking credentials, a security researcher said.

Hackers ban Battlefield 3 players to highlight anti-cheating flaws

"Hackers have banned some players of the popular Battlefield 3 game to send a message to developers at Electronic Arts (EA) that its anti-cheating software is flawed. A junior member of the Artificial Aiming game hacking website revealed that he and his anonymous hacking group are “framing” players to make the controversial PunkBuster software believe they were cheating in game. The group took responsibility for a previous attack in 2011 and said it has already banned more than 150 Battlefield 3 players to show how easy it is for PunkBuster to wrongly block a player."

Lindsay Lohan Leaked Playboy Photos Still Online: Pictures Causing Hef to Sue?

"Now, the question is turning away from where can you see them (here and links can be found here) to "is Hugh Hefner going to sue somebody over them?" Well, the latest info is that there's still "No word on whether Playboy will pursue legal remedies over the leak.

How hackers gave Subway a $3 million lesson in point-of-sale security

"For thousands of customers of Subway restaurants around the US over the past few years, paying for their $5 footlong sub was a ticket to having their credit card data stolen. In a scheme dating back at least to 2008, a band of Romanian hackers is alleged to have stolen payment card data from the point-of-sale (POS) systems of hundreds of small businesses, including more than 150 Subway restaurant franchises and at least 50 other small retailers.

Microsoft squashes Duqu threat with Windows patch

"A month after releasing a temporary workaround to block malware exploiting a Windows kernel vulnerability, Microsoft today issued a patch for all supported releases of Windows aimed at putting an end to attacks based on the Duqu worm."

Previous post Next post 8 Out of 10 Software Apps Fail Security Test

"In fact, eight out of 10 software applications fail to meet a security assessment, according to a State of Software Security report by Veracode. That’s based on an automated analysis of 9,910 applications submitted to Veracode’s online security testing platform in the last 18 months.

Two Chinese crackers call for code of conduct

"Two Chinese crackers have released a code of conduct calling for the rejection of cybertheft. Gong Wei and Wan Tao, released their "Hackers' Self-Discipline Convention" to the Chinese press and posted it onto the world wide wibble. The document is a moral code that outlines appropriate hacking activities. According to the document, hackers should not obtain money through stealing from the public. Hacking groups will also not spread tools that are meant to take income. It also calls for the public's privacy, especially that of children and minors, should be protected.

Blizzard: Diablo 3 Internet Requirement Prevents Hacking

"Despite recent talk that Diablo 3's required Internet connection was all about the player's character and Battle.net's feature set, game director Jay Wilson made it clear that the requirement is also to prevent the same amount of hacking as seen with Diablo 2. The revelation was made while explaining why it's a bad idea to have an offline mode for the upcoming action-RPG game..."
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