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Google Android App Inventor

You can build just about any app you can imagine with App Inventor. Often people begin by building games like WhackAMole or games that let you draw funny pictures on your friend's faces. You can even make use of the phone's sensors to move a ball through a maze based on tilting the phone.

Google Gmail to harness HTML5

In keeping with Google's enthusiasm for the emerging HTML5 standard, many upcoming features of the company's Gmail Web-based e-mail service will be rendered in HTML5, said Adam de Boor, a staff software engineer working on the service.ce.

"We have things that we can do much more efficiently in HTML5," said De Boor, speaking Thursday at the Usenix WebApps '10 in Boston.

"HTML5 is exciting to me insofar as to how many browser makers are adopting it," he said, adding, "I have high hopes for IE9."

Google to sacrifice Wi-Fi coder

Someone has to pay


Search engine Google seems likely to fire the bloke who wrote the wi-fi code that sniffed people's networks.

The unnamed bloke wrote the code as part of the Google Street Car software package and Google claims it should never have been there. The wi-fi sniffing software had got Google into shedloads of hotwater in the EU. The search engine claims it never wanted that data in the first place.

Google gives Microsoft 5 days to fix XP zero-day bug

A Google engineer today published attack code that exploits a zero-day vulnerability in Windows XP, giving hackers a new way to hijack and infect systems with malware.

But other security experts objected to the way the engineer disclosed the bug -- just five days after it was reported to Microsoft -- and said the move is more evidence of the ongoing, and increasingly public, war between the two giants.

Microsoft said it is investigating the vulnerability and would have more information on its next steps later today.

Google ditches Windows on security concerns

Google is phasing out the internal use of Microsoft’s ubiquitous Windows operating system because of security concerns, according to several Google employees.

The directive to move to other operating systems began in earnest in January, after Google’s Chinese operations were hacked, and could effectively end the use of Windows at Google, which employs more than 10,000 workers internationally.“We’re not doing any more Windows. It is a security effort,” said one Google employee.

Browser Add-on Blocks Google Analytics

Google has released a Web browser add-on that will stop the browser from sending information to the Google Analytics service, which Web sites can use to collect data about their visitors.

Google said it developed the tool "to provide website visitors with more choice about how their data is collected."

Web site owners can incorporate Google's Analytics JavaScript code on their site to collect data such as when a person visited a Web site, if the person has been there before and the search terms a person used to find the Web site.

Google Looks to Take Over Your TV

With set-top TV boxes connected to the internet, search engine providers like Google and Microsoft are looking to deploy targeted ads, much like targeted ads seen online when browsing. Back in 2007 Google signed a deal with DISH network to provide targeted ad services.

After a dispute about inventory, Google reportedly almost walked away from DISH, according to the Business Insider. Then Microsoft showed some interest.

Overnight Google began looking for ways to renew the contract and avoid getting outmaneuvered by its smaller rival.

Yahoo stabs at Google in new ad

Yahoo has always seemed like such a nice place. The sort of place where, if you happened upon it by chance, the inhabitants would sit you down, give you a cup of tea and a cookie, and ask you what brought you to its parts. They'd even ask you how to pronounce your name.

So how odd and strangely refreshing to see Yahoo roll up a little ball of competitive spit and blow it in the direction of Google.

Bringing E-Books to Your Browser

Google wants to bring your digital book reader into the cloud.

The company has just announced plans to launch its own digital bookstore, a Web-based effort called Google Editions. The store will open sometime toward the middle of the year, a Google spokesperson confirmed to me, possibly as early as late June or July. And unlike many of the current e-book options on the market, Google Editions will let you buy and use its books wherever you want.
Google Editions: Google's Digital Bookstore

With Bumptop, Google Gains Multi-Touch Ammo

Google just landed some impressive 3D desktop software in its purchase of Bump Technologies, but a looming patent battle with Apple suggests that Google also had BumpTop's multi-touch technology on the brain when it gobbled up the company.

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