Computers

Are We Losing Interest in Computers?

"As part of its financial website, Google allows users to compare search traffic of aggregated industries against the developing price of stock. The search traffic is normalized to the value of 1.0 and the search volume that occurred on January 1, 2004. Don't expect any dramatic revelations or search numbers or even a search volume pertaining to a single company. However, the selection of 27 industries and related search terms may cause some speculation of a changing way how we acquire information.

Computer Learns to Understand Written Text

"Computers: They sure can do a lot of things now. But how smart are they really? A new MIT study says they're catching up to us, as they're beginning to understand the meaning of written, human-readable, English-language text. You know, like human beings. To prove this, a computer at MIT was forced to play the complex video-game "Civilization." At first, it wasn't given any help, but simply informed when it was winning and losing. Then researchers "augmented a machine-learning system" with a "Civilization" instruction manual..."

Only 39% Curse At Their Computers?

"That's what we are to believe based upon a survey of 14,284 individuals conducted by security vendor Avira. That survey found that 39 percent of respondents 'cursed or yelled at the computer out loud.' And no computer is needed to calculate the implication: 61% of those participating in the poll believe themselves to have never once uttered a profanity or raised their voice in the direction of a malfunctioning machine.

First Hot Ice Computer Created

A computer made entirely of sodium acetate, known as hot ice, solves mazes and other problems. It also occasionally hangs. If you've ever used a chemical hand warmer, you'll be familiar with sodium acetate. These bags of liquid are supersaturated solutions of sodium acetate that has supercooled to ambient temperature. Clicking a metal disc in the solution creates a nucleation center that causes the solution to rapidly crystallize, releasing heat. Heating the solid turns it back into a liquid, thereby recharging the hand warmer.

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