Cellphone

Feds ask telcos: Please stop letting workers who climb up cell towers die

"According to the agency, 13 worker fatalities occurred in 2013, “more than in the previous two years combined.” OSHA added, “This disturbing trend appears to be continuing, with... four worker deaths occurring in the first five weeks of 2014.”"

T-shirt charges your phone by absorbing ambient sound

"The shirts utilize ambient sound as a catalyst to produce electric voltage, and were rolled out just in time for the Glastonbury Music Festival in Britain. Developers hoped that the shirts would offer a convenient, eco-friendly way for festival goers to charge their phones while they're rocking out away from the grid. The material used in the shirts is made from a product called piezoelectric film, which is capable of transforming sound waves into an electric charge via the compression of interlaced quartz crystals.

Motorola Droid X Confirmed for July

Wednesday Verizon fired over a rather lengthy email announcing that the Motorola DROID X will be available in stores starting July 15. The new phone will cost $199.99 after a $100 mail-in rebate, and will require Verizon's customary 2-year ball and chain (aka contract). As previously reported, this beast will come packed with a 4.3-inch high-resolution screen (854 x 480), a 1GHz OMAP processor, 24 GB of storage (8 GB internal, 16 GB removable), and 3G Mobile Hotspot capabilities (subscription required).

"Nine months ago, we made a commitment to our customers to bring the openness of Android to the Verizon Wireless network," said John Stratton, executive vice president and chief marketing officer for Verizon Wireless. "Since then, we have introduced the top-selling Android phone in the marketplace today – the DROID by Motorola. DROID X takes that commitment to another level with exclusive content, faster processing speeds, and, of course, the reliability of our network."

San Francisco rules on cellphone radiation

San Francisco's Board of Supervisors has voted overwhelmingly in favour of a law requiring retailers to display the amount of radiation emitted by cellphones. It's likely to become law after a ten-day comment period.

Under the new law, retailers will have to display the specific absorption rate (SPR) of each phone - the amount of radiation it produces that is absorbed into the user's body - or face a $300 fine. The SPR varies from phone to phone.

OMSMark Mobile Benchmark

Espoo, Finland – April 20, 2010. Rightware Oy, the world’s leading developer of benchmarking software for mobile and embedded devices, launched today OMSMark™, a new benchmarking software developed in cooperation with China Mobile.

Mexico may cut millions of cellphones to fight crime

Advertisements on government radio and television have been urging Mexicans for weeks to register their cellphones by sending their personal details as a text message, but on Thursday 30 million lines remained unregistered as the Saturday deadline neared.

Analysts said that any related losses for Mexico's largest wireless operator, America Movil, would be tiny relative to the company's overall sales.

 
 
 

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Nokia’s 5230; cheap and smart

As Nokia World draws closer, our favorite Finnish phone maker has just taken the wraps off one of several new handsets set to drop in the near future. Yet another full touchscreen device that looks exactly like the 5800, the 5230’s features include a 3.2-inch 360×640 display, 2 megapixel camera, aGPS, 70MB of internal memory and feature three flavors of dual-band 3.6Mbps UMTS/HSDPA (850/1900, 850/2100 and 900/2100). So what could possibly be interesting about this handset, you’re wondering?

One Day, 7,400 Tickets: NYPD Cracks Down on Chatty Drivers

New York police issued more than 7,400 tickets last week in a 24-hour crackdown on cellphone-using drivers. The police’s goal was to cut down on cellphone use while behind the wheel in accordance with New York law, and in light of newly released research showing that texting while driving is particularly risky. Officers gave fair warning of its planned blitz, but studies have shown that New York drivers typically ignore the law. Thursday was no different.

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