Broadband

Internet bandwidth cap is pure evil

So you're paying a fortune for your Internet access and it's fast, but it's capped. I'm with Rogers (Robbers) here in Canada and I'm paying for their fastest service, but it's capped at 175GB? Make sense? NO. Why would their fastest premium service have a low bandwidth cap of only 175GB. The same reason all over their services have a cap, to GOUGE their customers and make massive profits. Well, I'm dropping Roger and going to try TekSavvy. What's your feeling on this?

Gap between advertised, actual broadband speeds growing

Here's the good news for British Internet users: the average "actual fixed-line residential broadband speed" for most ISPs has jumped by an amazing 25 percent over the past year. That's according to the United Kingdom's telecom regulator Ofcom, which commissioned a tracking study on broadband rates conducted by the research company SamKnows.

The speeds have leaped from 4.1Mbps to 5.2Mbps over the last twelve months, with many ISPs offering faster packages.

Should broadband data hogs pay more?

"Just over a year ago, Time Warner Cable rolled out an experiment in several cities: monthly data limits for Internet usage that ranged from 5GB to 40GB. Data costs money, and consumers would need to start paying their fair share; the experiment seemed to promise an end to the all-you-can-eat Internet buffet at which contented consumers had stuffed themselves for a decade. Food analogies were embraced by the company, with COO Landel Hobbs saying at the time, "When you go to lunch with a friend, do you split the bill in half if he gets the steak and you have a salad?"

FCC Plans Study to Measure Broadband Speeds

" The Federal Communications Commission wants to find out whether broadband providers are delivering Internet connections that are as fast as advertised.

The FCC is seeking 10,000 volunteers to take part in a study of residential broadband speeds. Specialized equipment will be installed in homes across the country to measure Internet connections. Those results will then be compared with advertised speeds. The agency hopes to get a cross section of volunteers who subscribe to broadband services provided by a range of phone and cable TV companies.

4Mbps broadband for all to cost $23 billion

"The FCC has set a 4Mbps download target for universal US broadband—but how to get those (modest) speeds to underserved areas? According to a new report (PDF) from the Commission, we can forget about fiber—it costs too much. Underserved areas would be served best by DSL, some 4G wireless coverage, and satellite service for those who truly live in the boondocks.

But the price for all this non-cutting-edge tech is still steep: $23.5 billion.
We're going to fund... DSL?

National Broadband Could Cost $350 Billion

The total cost of developing a universal broadband plan for the United States could run as high as $350 billion, but the plan would produce major economic and social benefits ranging from improving healthcare and education to helping people with disabilities and improving public safety programs, according to a report prepared by an FCC task force.

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