Game Rating System (ESRB)?

 
 
 

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Anonymous

My $0.02 is that the system is flawed, games should be rated more along the guidelines that movies are. Mainly with sexual themes. Movies can show some nudity and some pretty heavy themes and still get off with a PG-13 rating, games on the other hand can't. If a game so much as shows nudity or sexual themes it is basically guaranteed an "M" or an "AO" rating. Personally I think this is too strict and it is mainly just an American thing with being uptight about themes like that. Look at Fahrenheit (otherwise known as Indigo Prophecy). That game gets an AO rating here for a sex scene but in Europe it just gets a 16+ rating. But I'm getting into another tangent so I digress.

3dGameMan
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About parents, me being one... Fact is, a lot of parents, me excluded have no idea about games or the rating system. Most are to busy working and computing to even spend quality time with their kids, let alone research the games they're playing. This shouldn't be the case, but it's the sad reality of things these days. It's a catch 22. We work like animals to afford things we don't really need and sometimes we are no happier and miss out on a lot of priceless moments.

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Dynam
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My opinion of the game rating system is that it's trash. Video game developers edit their games to be different from what they intended in order to get a specific rating. Take, for example, The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time. None of the blood in that game that flies through the air is red (prominent example being the final scene where Link gives Ganon the final blow to finish him), but blood that is splattered on the ground and walls (like in the Shadow Temple and the Kakariko Well) is red. The reason for this is because in order for Nintendo to get an E rating, they couldn't have airborne blood (that would have caused them to get a T rating), and of course we can't have that, their sales would go down because of it.

There are many more examples where game developers change their original ideas in order to get a lower rating in order to increase sales (and understandably so), and I personally feel like that's wrong that they should be forced to do that by the ESRB. What should be done, in my opinion, is that parents need to quit being lazy and read a synopsis of the game they're about to buy on wikipedia or a video game reviewing site like IGN instead of blindly following a rating system that's showing its age.

3dGameMan
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Yea, like many things, at first it's well intentioned, but after a while somehow becomes corrupted/twisted into something else.

Razear
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Very seldom do we see games advertised as 'C' or 'A'. The majority of games I see are rated 'M', which kind of makes sense since the average gamer is in their mid-30s.

Anonymous

Doesn't matter, parents are gonna ignore the ratings and whine anyways.

Anonymous

Just saying, You should include PEGI to that video. But helpfull anyway :)

DeV
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Why this thing even exist if no one (Parents nor sellers) use it ? ...