Ars Technica

Share your Wiimote, share your wife: We Dare... WTF?

The video for Ubisoft's upcoming Wii game called We Dare looks like a joke. It has been spreading all over the Internet, and the most common response has been disbelief. This is a game that is supposed to be played with your very attractive friends in order to have an excuse to do sexy things with one another. Do you know anyone who has a Wii and looks like these people? When watching the trailer, think of how uncomfortable this would be in real life.

Let's watch... together.

Canadians continue to rage against metered billing

"The dust has at least temporarily settled on Canada's controversial decision to let its biggest ISPs charge smaller, competitive ISPs on a metered, or Usage-Based Billing (UBB) schedule, a decision later suspended by The Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission.

How the atom bomb helped give birth to the Internet

"Johnny Ryan's A History of the Internet and the Digital Future has just been released and is already drawing rave reviews. Ars Technica is proud to present three chapters from the book, condensed and adapted for our readers. This first installment is adapted from Chapter 1, "A Concept Born in the Shadow of the Nuke," and it looks at the role that the prospect of nuclear war played in the technical and policy decisions that gave rise to the Internet..."

Physicists build world's first antilaser

"Less than a year after it was first suggested, the world’s first antilaser is here. A team of physicists have built a contraption that, instead of flashing bright beams, utterly extinguishes specific wavelengths of light. Conventional lasers create intense beams of light by stimulating atoms to spit out a coherent beam of light in which all the light waves march in lockstep. The crests of one wave match the crests of all the others, and troughs match up with troughs. The antilaser does the reverse: Two perfect beams of laser light go in, and are completely absorbed."

Ask Ars: What is the best way to use a Li-ion battery?

"Question: How do I take care of a Lithium Ion battery to prolong its life? Should I charge it frequently or drain it fully before charging it?

Does sex discrimination in science keep women down?

"Today, more than half of all PhDs in the life sciences are awarded to women, compared to a measly 13 percent bestowed upon women in 1970. However, women still lag far behind men in full professorships and tenure track positions in math-intensive fields.

How one man tracked down Anonymous—and paid a heavy price

"Aaron Barr believed he had penetrated Anonymous. The loose hacker collective had been responsible for everything from anti-Scientology protests to pro-Wikileaks attacks on MasterCard and Visa, and the FBI was now after them. But matching their online identities to real-world names and locations proved daunting. Barr found a way to crack the code. In a private e-mail to a colleague at his security firm HBGary Federal, which sells digital tools to the US government, the CEO bragged about his research project.

Ask Ars: If I'm printing in color, should I get a laser or an inkjet printer?

"Question: So I want to print in color, and with the cost of color lasers coming down, I am wondering: laser versus inkjet? When does laser make sense?...It's true that the cost of color laser printers has come down significantly, particularly on the higher end. Most still don't beat inkjet printers in terms of price, but some of their other advantages—speed and volume, namely—can make a high-end laser printer a good investment if you have the up-front money for it.

Big Cable fed up with endless P2P porn subpoenas

"The big ISPs, especially Comcast and Time Warner Cable, have intervened for months in massive file-sharing lawsuits, telling judges that they simply can't drop all of their activity for law enforcement in order to spend weeks doing IP address lookups on behalf of pornographers. And, when the ISPs get the chance to make their arguments before judges, they routinely go beyond complaints about the workload and challenge the very basis of the mass lawsuits.

Tech giants to enable IPv6 on "World IPv6 Day" in June

"The Internet Society, an organization dedicated to the good of the Internet, is organizing "World IPv6 Day" on June 8 of this year. Web giants Facebook, Yahoo, and Google, with a combined one billion visitors per day, are participating by enabling IPv6 for their main services that day. Content distributors Limelight and Akamai are also joining the party by enabling their customers to participate. But unlike during the IETF IPv6 experiment, IPv4 won't be turned off."

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