Ars Technica

Ninja power: open-source HTML5 toolset aims to enable richer Web apps

"Modern HTML rendering engines and emerging standards make it possible to create a new class of rich experiences that could previously be achieved only with native development toolkits—but developers need better Web development frameworks and authoring tools in order to take advantage of the possibilities. Three new open-source software projects developed at Motorola Mobility hope to address the problem.

Download Microsoft Office 2013 customer preview now

"Microsoft today released a customer preview of the next generation of Microsoft Office, which is optimized for both touchscreens and traditional desktops. While the new features of Office are definitely tailored to Windows 8, the suite will work on both Windows 8 and Windows 7. You can test it out now by going to the Office Customer Preview link. (Caution: IE might be needed to view linked page, inaddition download and installation is a bit slow.).."

Hard drive supplies back to pre-flood levels, but prices aren't

"Last October, flooding in Thailand took a huge bite out of hard disk drive supplies, taking out about a quarter of the world's HDD manufacturing capacity. The impact of that disaster has passed, and supply levels are back to near where they were before last October's disaster.

DVDs and Blu-rays will now carry two unskippable government warnings

"You know those FBI warning messages that appear at the beginning of DVDs and Blu-ray discs? They're getting an upgrade—and they're multiplying. The US government yesterday rolled out not one but two copyright notices, one to "warn" and one to "educate." Six major movie studios will begin using the new notices this week..."

Bandwidth explosion: As Internet use soars, can bottlenecks be averted?

"As the head of a bandwidth assessment group at the IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) and past chairman of the IEEE's task force on 40 Gigabit and 100 Gigabit per second Ethernet, John D'Ambrosia is among the people who will help guide the world toward 400 Gigabit and even Terabit per second speeds. But will our capacity to deliver bandwidth keep up with the human race's ability to consume it?"

HAMR time: Seagate demos terabit-per-inch hard disk technology

"Seagate is preparing the first commercial hard disks capable of storing one trillion bits of data per square inch on its platters using a technology called heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR). That means 3.5-inch hard drives with capacities of 6 terabytes could be just around the corner—and 60-terabyte drives are that much closer to becoming a reality.

Rumor: Valve potentially working on a 'Steam Box' console with partners

"Valve may be developing a PC hardware spec to potentially package with Steam software in a "Steam Box" bundle, according to The Verge.

How the next Xbox could stop you from playing used games

"A recent Kotaku post cites "one reliable industry source" to suggest that the still-unannounced successor to Microsoft's Xbox 360 will somehow prevent used games from being played on the system. The idea remains an unconfirmed rumor, of course, but it's something that members of the game industry have floated repeatedly in the past. It's also a move that would likely find hefty support from publishers looking for a way to stop what they see as erosion of their profits thanks to used games (the reality is a bit more complicated than that, but we won't rehash that old argument here).

Microsoft now paid royalties on 70% of US Android smartphones

"LG has become the latest in a long line of Android handset vendors to sign a patent licensing agreement with Microsoft. The agreement allows the South Korean conglomerate to use Microsoft patented technology in phones, tablets, and other consumer electronics running both Android and Chrome OS.

How hackers gave Subway a $3 million lesson in point-of-sale security

"For thousands of customers of Subway restaurants around the US over the past few years, paying for their $5 footlong sub was a ticket to having their credit card data stolen. In a scheme dating back at least to 2008, a band of Romanian hackers is alleged to have stolen payment card data from the point-of-sale (POS) systems of hundreds of small businesses, including more than 150 Subway restaurant franchises and at least 50 other small retailers.

Syndicate content