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Modeling a black hole with a 300 GigaWatt laser

Researchers have figured out how to recreate the environment near a black hole in order to understand the processes that cause them to emit high energy X-rays.

First black hole for light created on Earth

An electromagnetic "black holeMovie Camera" that sucks in surrounding light has been built for the first time.

The device, which works at microwave frequencies, may soon be extended to trap visible light, leading to an entirely new way of harvesting solar energy to generate electricity.

Your iPhone Is Now Your Car Keys

Five months ago, someone cobbled together a spoof video about an iPhone app that could remotely unlock and start a car. Oh, how we laughed. Now, take one guess at what Viper SmartStart, an iPhone app announced today, actually does.

iRobot Makes First Version of T-1000

iRobot's soft, shape-shifting robot blob can roll around and change shape, and it will be able to squeeze through tiny cracks in a wall when the project is finished. Video presented at IEEE IROS 2009. Read more robot news at http://spectrum.ieee...

Best part starts at 1:50!

Computers Faster Only for 75 More Years

With the speed of computers so regularly seeing dramatic increases in their processing speed, it seems that it shouldn't be too long before the machines become infinitely fast -- except they can't.

A pair of physicists has shown that computers have a speed limit as unbreakable as the speed of light. If processors continue to accelerate as they have in the past, we'll hit the wall of faster processing in less than a century.

Unemployed? Blogging? Don't Put Ads On Your Site!

For quite some time, many people credited part of the rise of blogging to the fact that many folks in the tech industry found themselves out of work in the wake of the dot com bubble bursting. Suddenly there were lots of tech geeks, who were always online and had stuff to say -- and now plenty of extra time to say it. It didn't take long for a whole slew of tools to pop up to make that happen, and voila, blogging revolution.

Superconductor World Record Surpasses 250K

Superconductors.ORG herein reports the observation of record high superconductivity near 254 Kelvin (-19C, -2F). This temperature critical (Tc) is believed accurate +/- 2 degrees, making this the first material to enter a superconductive state at temperatures commonly found in household freezers.

NSW Police: Don't use Windows for internet banking

Cybercrime expert endorses Linux, iPhone when banking online.

Consumers wanting to safely connect to their internet banking service should use Linux or the Apple iPhone, according to a detective inspector from the NSW Police, who was giving evidence on behalf of the NSW Government at the public hearing into Cybercrime today in Sydney.

Detective Inspector Bruce van der Graaf from the Computer Crime Investigation Unit told the hearing that he uses two rules to protect himself from cybercriminals when banking online.

NAND Flash shortage coming

Taiwan memory module makers in a panic

Memory manufacturers are at panic stations after news has been building of a NAND Flash memory shortage.

Digitimes reports that memory module houses are moving to diversify their NAND flash suppliers to minimise procurement risk. The shortage has been caused by major chip producers Samsung, Toshiba, Micron and Hynix allocating huge amounts of NAND flash for lucrative Apple devices.

Nuclear Batteries Solve The Shrinking Gadget Conundrum

It sucks that batteries are nearly bigger than the gadgets they're powering, but thanks to University of Missouri researchers and some tiny nuclear batteries, that'll one day be an issue of the past. Yeah, you read right. Tiny. Nuclear. Batteries.

The real secret behind the size of the batteries is the use of new liquid semiconductors instead of tired old solid semiconductors. That's great, because nuclear batteries aren't a new idea, nor are they terrifying and harmful according to Jae Kwon, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Missouri:

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