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FBI uses PS3 to fight pedophiles

Great for cracking passwords, Slim version not. Well, you can't say there aren't many uses for PlayStation 3, as not only is it a favorite gaming device for many users, but has now been established as a high-tech tool in fighting crime. AXcess News reports that Sony's consoles are now being used to crack passwords on various archives most notably those from people charged of pedophilia.

The Drums of Cyberwar

Countries around the world are preparing for cyberwarfare, according to a new report from McAfee. The North Atlantic Treaty Organization and the United States have set up organizations to study cyberattacks and possibly trigger a physical response, for example. In fact, some international relationships could be described as a state of cyber-cold war, the report suggests.

Group wants social networks involved in fighting cyberbullies

Cyberbullying remains a problem for kids between 11 and 18, a UK-based anti-bullying group has found, and it wants social networks to step up and help with improved UIs and support services for kids in need. "I just want you to know what a fat, evil, sadistic cow you are. I want to see you suffer as slow and painful a death as possible." That's one of many messages sent to a teenager named Claire who had gotten into a disagreement over a basketball game. Another teen named Sam hanged himself after being "bombarded by cruel jibes" on Bebo over his taste in music and clothing.

Start-up claims its DVDs last 1,000 years

If you really, really need to make sure those precious photos of yours last virtually forever - or at least longer than the average two- to five-year lifespan of consumer-grade DVDs, then start-up Cranberry LLC has the answer for you: a DVD that literally lasts a millennium.

What Intel just bought for $1.25 billion: Less risk

Even for a company as powerful as Intel, with $13 billion in cash on the books, $1.25 billion is a lot of money. So why drop that huge quantity of money in the lap of its biggest rival, Advanced Micro Devices?

The payment is, of course, to settle the antitrust suit AMD brought against Intel five years ago. AMD's stock surged 22 percent Thursday after the chipmakers announced the agreement, but Intel's share price dropped 1 percent, indicating which company the investors thought got the better deal.

HP to buy 3Com for $2.7 billion

Hewlett-Packard Co. announced Wednesday it will purchase networking company 3Com for $2.7 billion, and also preannounced higher fiscal fourth-quarter earnings and raised its outlook for fiscal 2010.

The deal is worth $7.90 per share of 3Com, which is 39% higher than the stock's closing price of $5.69 on Wednesday. Shares of 3Com (COMS) soared 35% after hours on the announcement.

Google's Purchase of Skype Rival Gizmo5 Could Benefit You

Has Google found the final piece of its voice-calling puzzle? Rumors have it that the acquisition-happy search giant has acquired Gizmo5, a Skype-like VoIP startup. TechCrunch is reporting googlethat Google has plunked down $30 million in cash for Gizmo5, which offers a software app that lets you make free phone calls to other Gizmo users, as well as inexpensive calls to landlines and cell phones. It supports SMS and instant messaging, too.

AP IMPACT: Framed for Child Porn _ by a PC Virus

Of all the sinister things that Internet viruses do, this might be the worst: They can make you an unsuspecting collector of child pornography. Heinous pictures and videos can be deposited on computers by viruses — the malicious programs better known for swiping your credit card numbers. In this twist, it's your reputation that's stolen.

Pedophiles can exploit virus-infected PCs to remotely store and view their stash without fear they'll get caught. Pranksters or someone trying to frame you can tap viruses to make it appear that you surf illegal Web sites.

Uracil Made in the Lab

NASA scientists studying the origin of life have reproduced uracil, a key component of our hereditary material, in the laboratory. They discovered that an ice sample containing pyrimidine exposed to ultraviolet radiation under space-like conditions produces this essential ingredient of life.

Pyrimidine is a ring-shaped molecule made up of carbon and nitrogen and is the basic structure for uracil, part of a genetic code found in ribonucleic acid (RNA). RNA is central to protein synthesis, but has many other roles.

"We have demonstrated for the first time that we can make uracil, a component of RNA, non-biologically in a laboratory under conditions found in space," said Michel Nuevo, research scientist at NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif. "We are showing that these laboratory processes, which simulate occurrences in outer space, can make a fundamental building block used by living organisms on Earth."

The Cloud: a short introduction

Few terms have been as simultaneously hyped and reviled as "cloud computing," but there's definitely more to the phenomenon than just a buzzword and some vague talk of "efficiencies" and "agility." We've put together this short, simple introduction to cloud computing that you can send to your CIO the next time you catch him abusing "the cloud" at a meeting. There's a kind of supply-and-demand dynamic that applies to technical terms—when a few knowledgeable insiders are hoarding a word, it maintains its meaning, but when the masses get hold of it and abuse it, it's quickly emptied of value.

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