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Google Public DNS

What is Google Public DNS?

Google Public DNS is a free, global Domain Name System (DNS) resolution service, that you can use as an alternative to your current DNS provider.

To try it out:

* Configure your network settings to use the IP addresses 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4 as your DNS servers or
* Read our configuration instructions.

If you decide to try Google Public DNS, your client programs will perform all DNS lookups using Google Public DNS.

Why does DNS matter?

New Bing Maps Beta Could be the Google Maps Killer

Microsoft is giving Bing Maps a much needed refresh in an attempt to compete with Google’s dominant product. The new beta utilizes Microsoft’s own Silverlight multimedia plugin to provide smoother zooming and redraws. It also allows some very nice looking 3D building maps. It certainly does feel like a very polished experience, in contrast to Google’s more utilitarian aesthetic.

The complicated history of simple scientific facts

Every now and then, the public gets a glimpse at what goes into the making of scientific consensus on an important question. No, we're not talking about the infamous climate change emails—we're talking about how science really comes to its conclusions, a process that involves a few hundred years of work.

Nokia accuses LCD manufacturers of price fixing

Well we can't say that such accusations are rare, since we keep seeing them pop up every now and then, and this time it's Nokia's turn as the mobile phone giant has decided to take action against alleged price fixing on the LCD market.

The Finland-based company has filed a suit in the US Disctrict court accusing the likes of Samsung Electronics, LG Display, Sharp, Hitachi and Chunghwa Picture Tubes of fixing prices on handset LCDs.

Q&A Videos Galore

With over 300 Q&A videos completed to date, a lot of questions are already answered. Although there will always be questions, so I'll be here to answer them. Remember, 'Keep your questions coming' ;)

Large Hadron Collider starts up, produces first collisions

After a series of complications and setbacks, the Large Hadron Collider sees its first particle-particle collisions after a weekend of furious activity. While these weren't at any significant energy, the milestone marks an important step in getting the mammoth machine up and running and filling in the last space on the particle bingo card.

Modern Tech versus The Past

Most of us assume modern life is the peak of human achievement, but is it really? We decided to take a look at the major technologies of the modern world and compare them to their closest equivalent of pre-digital mankind. The results are surprising. (READ MORE)

Pick Rodney's Brain!

Before asking me a question in this forum area, please remember to keep it short and search to see if I've already answered it. This

Large Hadron Collider fully armed and operational

After being stalled by a catastrophic leak, a speck of bread and alleged time travelers, CERN has brought the Large Hadron Collider successfully back online with the full orbit of a proton beam. The 17-mile ring of the facility should continue to see particle beams pulsing through it in both directions over the weekend as it prepares for collisions, though the real Big Bang-style tests probably won't happen until January, as that's when the LHC will be at full strength.

Intel: Chips in brains will control computers by 2020

By the year 2020, you won't need a keyboard and mouse to control your computer, say Intel Corp. researchers. Instead, users will open documents and surf the Web using nothing more than their brain waves.

Scientists at Intel's research lab in Pittsburgh are working to find ways to read and harness human brain waves so they can be used to operate computers, television sets and cell phones. The brain waves would be harnessed with Intel-developed sensors implanted in people's brains.

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