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PayPal: India payments suspended

PayPal said a ban on personal transactions to and from India will continue for “at least a few months” while the online payment service tries to resolve a problem with local regulators.

The ban, which began Saturday and caught PayPal users in the country by surprise, relates to whether personal payments constitute “remittances,” or money sent home by people working abroad, the company said in a blog post Tuesday.

“We temporarily suspended these services to respond to enquiries from the Indian regulators, specifically questions on whether personal payments constitute remittances into Indi

Pirate has to pay Nintendo $1.5 mill

An Aussie bloke has agreed to pay Nintendo $1.5 million in damages after illegally copying and uploading one of its new games to the internet ahead of its release.

James Burt, 24, of Sinnamon Park in Queensland will pay Nintendo $1.5 million after an out-of-court settlement was struck to compensate the company for the loss of sales revenue. Burt made New Super Mario Bros for the Wii gaming console available for illegal download a week ahead of its official Australian release in November last year.

Burt will have to pay Nintendo's legal bill of $100,000.

Nvidia Unveils Switchable Graphics Technology

Nvidia on Tuesday introduced laptop technology that switches between integrated graphics and a graphics card, depending on application requirements, to extend battery life.

Called Optimus, the technology makes the switch seamlessly, using an Nvidia discrete graphics card for 3-D games, video, or other graphics-intensive applications; and, for more mundane computing tasks such as e-mail and Web browsing, running the far less power-hungry graphics chip integrated into the chipset that runs with the CPU.

Intel meets its match in IBM

There are few, if any, microprocessor manufacturers equal to Intel. IBM, however, is a very large exception.
Power7 wafer: Like Intel, IBM manufactures its own processors, something few 'chipmakers' do these days.

By the time Intel had introduced its latest processor for servers, the Itanium 9300, on Monday, IBM had already stolen Intel's thunder with its new Power7 chip technology, announced earlier in the morning.

And rightfully so: the Power7 is impressive. It has eight cores, while Intel's Itanium 9300 (PDF) has four.

Microchip that reliably detects viruses

A team of BYU engineers and chemists has created an inexpensive silicon microchip that reliably detects viruses,

Crackdown on cell phone boosters

"This is 'Magic' and this is 'Jack'," the little girl says in the video ad, holding her two cute puppy dogs up to the camera. The girl's father, magicJack inventor Dan Borislow, then asks her, "Kylie, did you know that your dad is going to let everybody try a magicJack in the whole country for free?"

Free for 30 days, that is. magicJack is a popular service comparable to VoIP, except that after you hook its app into a USB port on your broadband connected computer, you plug the USB gadget to the RJ11 slot in your telephone.

Bust of Major Hacker Ring

China announced a major bust of computer hackers, with state media saying officials had shut what they called the country's largest distributor of tools used in malicious Internet attacks.

Three people were arrested on suspicion of making hacking tools available online, the state-run Xinhua news agency said Monday.

Google to air ad during Super Bowl?

erhaps Google CEO Eric Scmidt's tweet said it all.

"Can't wait to watch the Super Bowl tomorrow. Be sure to watch the ads in the 3rd quarter (someone said 'Hell has indeed frozen over')," he wrote Saturday.

This tweet appears to be a response to speculation by John Battelle, founder of Federated Media Publishing, that one of the world's most ad-diffident companies would be running a brand ad during the Big Game's third quarter. (Kickoff is just after 3:20 p.m.

100 Gigahertz Graphene Transistors

IBM has created graphene transistors that leave silicon ones in the dust.

Quantum Clock Based on Aluminum Ion

Physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have built an enhanced version of an experimental atomic clock based on a single aluminum atom that is now the world’s most precise clock, more than twice as precise as the previous pacesetter based on a mercury atom.

The new aluminum clock would neither gain nor lose one second in about 3.7 billion years, according to measurements to be reported in Physical Review Letters.*

The new clock is the second version of NIST’s “quantum logic clock,” so called because it borrows the logical processing used for atoms storing

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