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Bandwidth explosion: As Internet use soars, can bottlenecks be averted?

"As the head of a bandwidth assessment group at the IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) and past chairman of the IEEE's task force on 40 Gigabit and 100 Gigabit per second Ethernet, John D'Ambrosia is among the people who will help guide the world toward 400 Gigabit and even Terabit per second speeds. But will our capacity to deliver bandwidth keep up with the human race's ability to consume it?"

Google Increases Bug Award to $20,000

"The company said that it will now award $20,000 for any bug that allows code execution on its "production systems". Google will also pay $10,000 for SQL injection bugs as well as for "certain types" of information disclosure, authentication, and authorization bypass bugs. The previous top reward of $3,133.70 now applies to "many types of XSS, XSRF, and other high-impact flaws in highly sensitive applications."

IT managers stressed out of their minds

"Nearly two thirds of IT managers are so stressed that they are thinking of packing it all and joining a new age commune where they can be calm. GFI Software today announced the results of its new IT Admin Stress Survey, which found that 69% of IT administrators have considered switching careers due to job stress. Apparently dealing with managers, end users, and tight deadlines were cited as the biggest contributors to work-related stress.

IBM creates breathing, high-density, light-weight lithium-air battery

"As part of its Battery 500 project — an initiative started by IBM in 2009 to produce a battery capable of powering a car for 500 miles — Big Blue has successfully demonstrated a light-weight, ultra-high-density, lithium-air battery.

Booth Babes aren’t Cosplayers

"Internet “journalism” is a dirty business. I think everyone should be aware of this fact, but it seems few are. The business model isn’t built to support well thought out commentary or unbiased coverage of news. At the end of the day, the people counting the money only care about traffic. In turn, every website’s primary goal is to make you load up the page. They don’t care if the content is good, and in many cases, bad content works even better..."

After Best Buy Swipes His Driver's License: No Returns For 90 Days

"Peter Peel of Middletown thought he had all the twists and turns he needed for at least a day when he bought "The French Connection" Blu-ray disc from Best Buy in early March. Unfortunately, the disc proved defective so, three days later, he brought it back to the Best Buy in Newington. That's when he got the surprise ending.

Researcher Finds Faster, Cheaper Way To Cool Electronic Devices

"A North Carolina State University researcher has developed a more efficient, less expensive way of cooling electronic devices – particularly devices that generate a lot of heat, such as lasers and power devices. The technique uses a “heat spreader” made of a copper-graphene composite, which is attached to the electronic device using an indium-graphene interface film “Both the copper-graphene and indium-graphene have higher thermal conductivity, allowing the device to cool efficiently,” says Dr.

Girls Around Me: One Woman's Defense of the 'Stalking' App

"Girls Around Me, the geo-location iPhone app, is under fire for undermining women’s privacy, but the controversy seems blown out of proportion. We're quick to ask what new way tech companies have devised to rob us of our privacy, but it's hard to see this app as a real threat to privacy or women. I consider it, instead, more of a wake-up call to those who publicly overshare.

Google Maps is now available for 8-bit Nintendo Entertainment Systems (NES)

Google Maps is now available for 8-bit Nintendo Entertainment Systems (NES). Availability in Google Store is TBD but you can try it on your browser by going to http://maps.google.com and clicking "Quest" in the upper right hand corner of the map. Trial Version: http://goo.gl/i4onu

HAMR time: Seagate demos terabit-per-inch hard disk technology

"Seagate is preparing the first commercial hard disks capable of storing one trillion bits of data per square inch on its platters using a technology called heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR). That means 3.5-inch hard drives with capacities of 6 terabytes could be just around the corner—and 60-terabyte drives are that much closer to becoming a reality.

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