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Can neuroscience cure gaming’s gun obsession?

"Atomic Antelope’s Chris Stevens, who created the interactive book Alice for iPad, hopes neuroscience research can find non-violent triggers to mimic the rush of pleasure gamers feel when firing guns during play. He's even calling on publishers to invest millions of dollars in cutting-edge magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners to better understand the impact of games on our brains. Stevens believes that by measuring physiological responses during play, developers can create compelling – and peaceful - experiences..."

Intel slashes SSD prices

"Intel is planning to cut the prices on its SSDs in August. The dark satanic rumour mill has manufactered a hell on earth rumour that Chipzilla is planning significant price reductions across its consumer SSD lineups, even in its new 330 series.

The biggest cuts will be to the 320 series. The retail version of the 300GB drive costing $464 instead of the previous $519, while the 600GB version will lose almost $200 of its retail price, falling from $1,059 to $879.

Linus Torvalds Says "F#$% You" to NVIDIA over Linux Support

"In a talk held at Aalto University in Helsinki Finland, Linus Torvalds addressed a question from one of the audience members regarding issues they had with a laptop running NVIDIA graphics and the lack of support for Linux. Linus' response can only be described as a very coarse and honest answer, skip to 48:14 to watch the question and his response. The complaints were regarding Optimus and Linux support and watch the video for more..."

Sandia’s floating, spinning heatsink promises 30x better CPU cooling

"Sandia Research Laboratory believes it has come up with a much more efficient solution that simply combines the heatsink and fan components into a single unit. What you effectively get is a spinning heatsink..."

WD sneaks into networking market

"Western Digital has sneaked its way into wireless home networking market and announced a couple of routers that will be a part of its newest My Net family lineup. The lineup includes a total of four different products and kicks off with My Net Switch, an 8-port Gigabit Switch that has Gigabit Ethernet support. Next in line is the My Net N600 HD dual-band router with combined data rate of up to 600Mbps (300Mbps per band), which also packs five ethernet ports and one USB port.

Highlights from AMD's Computex Taipei Showcase

"Computex Taipei might be over already but we still have a couple of stories from there to fill. Here we take a look at some of the Opteron and Trinity APU FM2 motherboards and Radeon 7000 series GPUs, presented to you by the fabulous AMD booth girls." -Read more

Computex 2012 Booth Babes

"Each year we look forward to Computex for the new products and exciting developments in technology and the industry. We love seeing technology evolve and perform faster and better. We are however realists, and we know that you have but one thing you seek from us during Computex . . . Booth Babes! Enjoy our first gallery of the wonderful women at the show."

The Poor Waste More Time On Digital Entertainment

"Children of parents with low social status are less able to resist the temptations of technological entertainment, a fact that impedes their education and adds to the obstacles such children face in obtaining financial comfort later in life. As explained in the article, poor parents and their children often waste both their time and money on heavily marketed entertainment systems.

Hard drive supplies back to pre-flood levels, but prices aren't

"Last October, flooding in Thailand took a huge bite out of hard disk drive supplies, taking out about a quarter of the world's HDD manufacturing capacity. The impact of that disaster has passed, and supply levels are back to near where they were before last October's disaster.

"Inexact" chips save power by fudging the maths

"Computer scientists have unveiled a computer chip that turns traditional thinking about mathematical accuracy on its head by fudging calculations.

The Rice University researchers say their “inexact” chip could be useful because it uses dramatically less power than conventional accurate processors.

The scientists claim the prototypes unveiled are 15 times more efficient because they allow occasional errors and could be used in some applications without having a negative effect."

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