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WD sneaks into networking market

"Western Digital has sneaked its way into wireless home networking market and announced a couple of routers that will be a part of its newest My Net family lineup. The lineup includes a total of four different products and kicks off with My Net Switch, an 8-port Gigabit Switch that has Gigabit Ethernet support. Next in line is the My Net N600 HD dual-band router with combined data rate of up to 600Mbps (300Mbps per band), which also packs five ethernet ports and one USB port.

Highlights from AMD's Computex Taipei Showcase

"Computex Taipei might be over already but we still have a couple of stories from there to fill. Here we take a look at some of the Opteron and Trinity APU FM2 motherboards and Radeon 7000 series GPUs, presented to you by the fabulous AMD booth girls." -Read more

Computex 2012 Booth Babes

"Each year we look forward to Computex for the new products and exciting developments in technology and the industry. We love seeing technology evolve and perform faster and better. We are however realists, and we know that you have but one thing you seek from us during Computex . . . Booth Babes! Enjoy our first gallery of the wonderful women at the show."

The Poor Waste More Time On Digital Entertainment

"Children of parents with low social status are less able to resist the temptations of technological entertainment, a fact that impedes their education and adds to the obstacles such children face in obtaining financial comfort later in life. As explained in the article, poor parents and their children often waste both their time and money on heavily marketed entertainment systems.

Hard drive supplies back to pre-flood levels, but prices aren't

"Last October, flooding in Thailand took a huge bite out of hard disk drive supplies, taking out about a quarter of the world's HDD manufacturing capacity. The impact of that disaster has passed, and supply levels are back to near where they were before last October's disaster.

"Inexact" chips save power by fudging the maths

"Computer scientists have unveiled a computer chip that turns traditional thinking about mathematical accuracy on its head by fudging calculations.

The Rice University researchers say their “inexact” chip could be useful because it uses dramatically less power than conventional accurate processors.

The scientists claim the prototypes unveiled are 15 times more efficient because they allow occasional errors and could be used in some applications without having a negative effect."

MIT’s Brainput boosts your brain power by offloading multitasking to a computer

"A group of American researchers from MIT, Indiana University, and Tufts University, led by Erin Treacy Solovey, have developed Brainput — pronounced brain-put, not bra-input — a system that can detect when your brain is trying to multitask, and offload some of that workload to a computer. The idea of using computers to do our grunt work isn’t exactly new — without them, the internet wouldn’t exist, manufacturing would be a very different beast, and we’d all have to get a lot better at mental arithmetic.

Millennial Moms Don't Let Sex Get in the Way of Smartphone Use

"It's no secret that moms are a tech-savvy bunch, but you might be surprised to learn exactly how they’re using their digital devices. According to a new survey from Meredith’s Parents Network, young moms are staying digitally connected everywhere no matter where they are—and we mean everywhere. Meredith’s second Moms & Media survey, which questioned around 1,000 moms born between 1977 and 1994, found that 21 percent of mothers use their smartphones in the bathroom, while 12 percent admitted to using their phones during sex.

DVDs and Blu-rays will now carry two unskippable government warnings

"You know those FBI warning messages that appear at the beginning of DVDs and Blu-ray discs? They're getting an upgrade—and they're multiplying. The US government yesterday rolled out not one but two copyright notices, one to "warn" and one to "educate." Six major movie studios will begin using the new notices this week..."

Diamonds Used To Increase Density, Performance of Phase-Change Memory

"Researchers at Johns Hopkins University have shown they can increase the density, performance and the durability of phase-change memory (PSM) by using diamonds to change the base alloy material. Instead of using the more typical method of applying heat to the alloy to change its state from amorphous to crystalline, thereby laying down bits in the material, the researchers used pressure from diamond-tipped tools.

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