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Students get deep Windows 7 price break

With its deepest Windows 7 discounts yet, Microsoft is targeting students who might otherwise chose Apple. The company has announced qualified college and university students can obtain Windows 7 for just $30 in the US and 30 pounds in the UK. Students in the US can pre-order their copies from September 17 and download with general availability on October 22, while UK students can begin pre-orders on September 22. Students in other countries can order from October 22, it's reported here.

Microsoft: Windows 7 upgrade can take nearly a day (Updated x2)

A Microsoft Software Engineer has posted the results of tests the company performed to the upgrade time of Windows 7. Worst case scenario is that it will take a bit over 20 hours. But a clean 32-bit install on what Microsoft calls "high-end hardware" should take only 30 minutes.

Mozilla releases Firefox 3.5.3 and 3.0.14 updates

The Mozilla team just released two new security updates for its popular web browser, Firefox 3.5.3 and Firefox 3.014. The updates are now available for Windows, Mac, and Linux users and fix several security issues as well as stability issues.

Specifically, the new update for Firefox 3.5x fixes crashes with evidence pointing to memory corruption. The team presumes that with enough effort, at least some of these bugs could be exploited to run arbitrary code.

Additionally, the default Windows font used to render the location-bar and other text fields was improperly displaying certain Unicode characters with tall line-height. An attacker could use this vulnerability to prevent a user from seeing the URL of a malicious site.

There are other security concerns addressed which can be found in the Security Advisories release notes.

Firefox 3.0.14 and Firefox 3.5.3 can be downloaded here.

Race is On to Patch Critical Windows Flaw

Security experts are concerned about the potential impact of a new security hole affecting the Windows operating system. The potential exists to create a worm that would allow an attacker to take complete control of vulnerable systems without any user interaction--a jackpot for malware developers.

This past Tuesday was Microsoft's big patch release day for the month of September. Microsoft released a total of five new Security Bulletins, all of them rated Critical. Microsoft quickly followed the regularly scheduled patch release with a Security Advisory warning of the new unpatched flaw.

Microsoft goes Open Source (OSI-Approved)!

Microsoft already had its own open source (OSI-approved) licenses, its own open source project hosting site and now it's adding its own non-profit open source foundation. That's right, the company that is still banging the patent drum against open source now has its own 501(c)(6) open source foundation. Officially called the CodePlex Foundation, it's a separate effort from the CodePlex site and is aimed at helping to get more commercial developers involved in open source. Considering how they continue to attack Linux and open source, will anyone take them seriously?

Windows XP: Finally on its Way Out?

The biggest danger to Windows 7 and Windows Vista isn't Mac OS X or Linux --- it's Windows XP, whose windows xp the aging operating system. But it looks as if XP may finally be on the way out, which is good news for Microsoft. Windows XP's share of the OS usage market fell 1.1 percentage points during August, tying its November 2008 record drop.

At the same time, Vista and Windows 7 use was up, Vista by 0.9 percent, and Windows 7 by 0.3 percent. Windows XP is still dominant, though, with 71.8 percent use, compared to 18.8 percent for Vista, and 1.2 percent for Windows 7. Mac OS X use has stalled, with 4.9 percent share.

Will Windows 7 Reboot PC Sales?

For the first time in years, the PC market is starting to draw serious attention from Wall Street. Dell (DELL) shares surged after the company beat earnings expectations for the second quarter. The next day chip giant Intel (INTC) gave the sector another lift by raising its forecast for PC processor sales. Hopes are building among investors that the industry will see a revival in growth as Microsoft (MSFT) unveils its new operating system, Windows 7, on Oct. 22 to replace its troubled Windows Vista.

HP, Dell back Microsoft in patent fight

Earlier this month, software giant Microsoft was shocked when they lost a patent dispute to i4i and were told that the word processing application Word would be blocked from sales starting in October.

Microsoft has appealed the decision and today has gotten some backup support from the large computer manufacturers (and big Microsoft customers) HP and Dell.

The companies asked the judge in the case to reconsider the injunction, or at least delay it by 120 days.

Inside Snow Leopard's hidden malware protection

While malware has long been an almost daily annoyance for Windows PCs, Mac users have become accustomed to not worrying about malicious software. Threats arise from time to time—in January of this year, for example, a Trojan horse made the rounds in pirated copies of Apple’s iWork software—but most Mac users these days are probably running without virus protection software. Apple’s encouraged that, too, by frequently touting the Mac’s resistance to malware in its advertising materials, especially when compared to Windows.

Porn collection put people off upgrading to Firefox 3

Mozilla’s Security team has disclosed a very interesting piece of research which suggests people refused to upgrade to the latest version of Firefox because they were afraid the browser would expose their, ahem, private collection of websites. In May, the company decided to have one last attempt at persuading the people on Firefox 2 to move up to Firefox 3, by hitting users of the old version with a pop-up that prompted them to upgrade. Those who declined were invited to fill out a questionnaire, asking them to reveal why they didn’t want the latest software. The number one reason for not upgrading was the new location bar, and the fact that it delved into people’s bookmark collections to suggest sites as they typed. No fewer than 25% of Firefox 3 refuseniks cited this as the reason they wouldn’t upgrade. In fact, almost all of the people who provided feedback had tried Firefox 3, didn’t like what they saw, and headed back to Firefox 2.

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