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Google Chrome OS: A Nice Place to Visit, But?

Google's Chrome operating system could mark a turning point in computing, but many questions remain. Today's rumor is the OS will be released to developers next week, answering some questions but probably raising even more. Google had previously promised Chrome OS, in some form, before the end of this year. Chrome OS strikes me as being just enough Linux to allow an underpowered computer to run Chrome browser and connect to cloud-based applications. How exciting can that really be?

No bugs in Windows 7

While other operating systems in Microsoft's stable were given security patches yesterday there was one important one that was considered still fine to run. Most people expected a few things to be found wrong with the newly released Windows 7, however there were no patches for the operating system.

Microsoft Patch Tuesday: What You Need to Know

Yesterday was Microsoft's Patch Tuesday for the month of November. There are 6 new Security Bulletins this month: 3 rated as Critical and 3 rated as Important. Not all Critical Security Bulletins are created equally though. You need to understand the implications of the flaw being patched and how it applies to your systems to determine how urgent the update is.

Benchmarks Show Firefox 3.6 Fastest Version Yet

Although Mozilla's Firefox 3.6 is still in beta, the CRN Test Center reviewers wanted to take a look at it because we measure the progress of a browser in development by doing a series of benchmark tests against each alpha, beta and final versions to determine whether there are performance improvements with each release. For instance, when we tested Firefox 3.6 Alpha 1, we were pretty impressed with the benchmark results.

AP IMPACT: Framed for Child Porn _ by a PC Virus

Of all the sinister things that Internet viruses do, this might be the worst: They can make you an unsuspecting collector of child pornography. Heinous pictures and videos can be deposited on computers by viruses — the malicious programs better known for swiping your credit card numbers. In this twist, it's your reputation that's stolen.

Pedophiles can exploit virus-infected PCs to remotely store and view their stash without fear they'll get caught. Pranksters or someone trying to frame you can tap viruses to make it appear that you surf illegal Web sites.

New X58 BIOS's Posted

New BIOS updates released for the EVGA X58 motherboards. Get em while their hot!

The Cloud: a short introduction

Few terms have been as simultaneously hyped and reviled as "cloud computing," but there's definitely more to the phenomenon than just a buzzword and some vague talk of "efficiencies" and "agility." We've put together this short, simple introduction to cloud computing that you can send to your CIO the next time you catch him abusing "the cloud" at a meeting. There's a kind of supply-and-demand dynamic that applies to technical terms—when a few knowledgeable insiders are hoarding a word, it maintains its meaning, but when the masses get hold of it and abuse it, it's quickly emptied of value.

Windows 7 outsells Vista by 234% in the US

While any user who's had "the pleasure" of running Vista knows this from personal experience, NPD's statistics now shed some light on just how bad the market needed Windows 7.

The NPD Group reports the initial Windows 7 (boxed) sales figures have exceeded those of Vista by impressive 234 percent in the US. Revenue growth on the other hand wasn't that great, although 82 percent better than Vista is still nice. Such revenue is reportedly a result of pre-order discounts and a "lack of promotional activity" for the Ultimate version.

Firefox turns five: Thanks for giving us a choice

Birthdays in the world of tech normally aren't that big of a deal for most folks. We tend to feel as much nostalgia toward hardware, software and services as we do toward flu shots and oil changes for the car. But even if you don't use Firefox -- and by the numbers, that's over 60% of you -- it's difficult to underestimate this once-upstart browser's impact on the way we experience the Internet, and how our software is developed in the first place.

Replacing monopoly with choice

Europe's browser wars heat up again

Complaints about Microsoft's anti-competitive browser bundling are still in full swing, even though the company said in July that it will no longer shield Internet Explorer (IE) from competition in Europe by bundling it with Windows.

Three competing browser developers have been working with the European Union's Competition Commission on the investigation into Microsoft's browser practices, and have now said that Microsoft's proposal to offer a ballot system for Windows users to select their default browser from a list is not good enough.
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