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Intel® Turbo Boost Technology Monitor

Intel® Turbo Boost Technology Monitor is a Windows Sidebar gadget which provides simple display of increase in processor frequency when applications request and Intel Turbo Boost Technology delivers more performance.

Supported Processors
Intel® Core™ i7 processor
Intel® Core™ i7 processor extreme edition
Intel® Core™i7 mobile processor
Intel® Core™i7 mobile processor extreme edition
Intel® Core™ i5 processor

Supported Operating Systems
Microsoft Windows Vista* 32bit & 64-bit editions with Service Pack 1 & 2.
Microsoft Windows 7* 32bit & 64bit editions.

Chrome OS goes 64-bit

Google's Chrome OS has been the darling of open source developers for a while, and now it just got a bit more serious.

ChromeiumOS64 is a new Chrome project with 64-bit support and it should offer a bit more potential for more serious use on proper, 64-bit CPUs. In addition to 64-bit support, ChromeiumOS64 also features Xen hypervisor! and allows users to run virtual machines on Linux or even Windows.

Microsoft loses font war in China

Microsoft has suffered a blow behind the bamboo curtain after a Chinese court ordered versions of Windows with a particular typeface withdrawn from sale.

Vole had an agreement with Chinese technology company, Zhongyi Electronic, which designs Chinese character fonts. However the court said that Vole violated the scope of licensing agreements and will have to stop selling its Chinese versions of its Windows 98, 2000, 2003 and Windows XP.

Pirates get innovative on Windows 7

Chinese pirates are doing something that Microsoft didn't – they are starting to peddle versions of Windows 7 on a USB stick.

The Netac U208 8GB USB drives preloaded with Windows 7 are being sold for 98 yuan, or about $14, according to the Chinese website 163. The drive, ironically with Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer's signature on the outside was being flogged in Shenzhen.

Microsoft to switch internal focus to Windows 8 in July 2010

With another month gone (boy that one flew by), it's time to take a look at what Microsoft Careers, a great source for scraps on future Microsoft products, had to say about Windows 8 over the last 30 days or so. This month we saw seven job postings regarding the successor to both Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2, each one offering a small glimpse into what Microsoft is thinking about. Before we go through them in chronological order, we should note that some of them have already been removed and others have been slightly reworded, so what you see below is the original unedited versions Microsoft first posted and which we saved until now. The first job posting is from November 3, 2009 and is looking for someone to fill the Software Engineering: Test job category by working on critical updates that will be delivered through Windows Update for Windows 8: (READ MORE)

Acer plans Chrome netbook for next year

Acer has given the Google Chrome operating system the thumbs up and plans to jack it under the bonnet of a netbook, which the company has been developing since mid-2009 in the second half of 2010.

Digitimes quotes Acer chairman JT Wang saying he expects to be the first vendor to launch Chrome-based netbook in the market. Acer is a long term backer of Google Operating systems. It was the first top-tier vendor to launch a Google Android-based netbook in the market.

Malware suspected of 'Black Screen' issue

Microsoft says that a problem with its Windows operating system, dubbed the 'Black Screen of Death' is not due to its latest security update.

Some Windows users are confronted by a totally black screen after they log on to their system.

It was thought that a security update on 10 November had been the cause, although this has now been discounted.

Reports suggest the problem also affects Windows Vista and XP, which experts are putting down to malware.

Hardware accelerated browsers next big thing

When Microsoft announced that it wanted to use hardware based acceleration for its next flavor of Internet Explorer, the tech mags were quick to praise the outfit for being jolly clever.

However it turns out that the world + dog is doing the same thing and it is not particularly clever or original. Mozilla has been on the blower to us saying that it is planning to do the same with Firefox. Already its developers have posted a prototype demonstrating the ability to take advantage of Direct2D and DirectWrite.

Firefox: Heat and the CPU usage problem

Firefox has a CPU usage issue and, consequently, can cause overheating problems in some laptops, particularly ultraportables. That's what I've found over the last couple of years.

But don't take my word for it. This is documented on a Mozilla support page entitled "Firefox consumes a lot of CPU resources." The page states: "At times, Firefox may require significant CPU [central processing unit] resources in order to download, process, and display Web content." And forum postings like this one about a Dell Netbook are not uncommon: "Mini9 would get way too hot."

ATI Catalyst 9.11 Windows 7 Driver Analysis

ATI just had to release the 9.11 driver on the day the HD 5970 launch. Honestly, as if I wasn't busy enough already. The whole release was also a bit more nightmarish than usual due to the fact that I had just re-set up my testbed and needed to re-test a bunch of new cards for the article.

Normally what would happen is the new drivers would come in, I pull up my graphs from the month before, I delete the 9.9s, move the 9.10s there and add the 9.11s. Because there was no data from the new testbed in regards to the HD 5850 and HD 5770, those cards had to be tested at the same time.

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