iMac DVD drive issues

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eire1274
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Okay, folks, revamping the old thread.

New (old) iMac G4, 800MHz PPC, classic 15" LCD attached to the cute round body (which is Apple's nice way of saying "hand's off, geeks!"). We are running Mac OS X 10.4.11 (Tiger).

No software in Mac OS sees the DVD drive. It is simply MISSING. However, I can boot into Open Firmware (Command+Alt+O+F) and enter "eject cd" and the drive responds appropriately. I can even boot from a disc, from Open Firmware. But Mac OS won't use it.

Huh?

Any ideas?

Added: I can also use the DRUTIL command via the terminal to find and eject the drive, and can insert a disc and push it in by hand, and it works! There is something mis set somewhere.

Nick McDermott

eire1274
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Well, no response here...

Anyway, I wiped out the hard disk and installed a fresh copy of Leopard (10.5.3) and everything suddenly worked exactly as it should. The old install was Mac OS 9 upgraded to 10.1, then 10.4, and I think somewhere along the line we got some command overwritten. The fresh install is running great.

By the way, if you want to put Leopard on a machine under 867Mhz the installer will freak out on you. However, there is a way. If you are looking to do the same, first DON'T BOTHER unless you have a minimum of 512Mb memory (768Mb optimally, 1Gb if you intend to run heavier programs). There is a trick via Open Firmware (Comand+Alt+O+F at boot) where you can change the reported clock speeds, and then boot the DVD. Works great despite being on unsupported hardware, as I even have a couple acquaintences who are running it on 600Mhz G3s (a little slower there, though).

800Mhz on 512Mb is totally usable (quicker than Tiger, too!), though I have a 512Mb SoDIMM on the way to beef it up for Photoshop.

Nick McDermott

spawnkiller
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Sorry that we can't help, i can't speak for other guys but i'm a big zero in mac ;)
i'm only a basic new user of linux and a enthusiast in windows :P

Gaming PC: MSI Z77A-G45 ::: Intel Core I7 3770k @ 4.83Ghz ::: EVGA GTX680SC Signature ~1300mhz Boost/7122mhz ram ::: 16GB 4*4gb G.Skill 2240mhz CL10 ::: ASUS Xonar DX ::: Crucial M4 128gb (windows) + Intel 330 180gb (Steam games) + 1TB Caviar Black (storage) ::: Cooler Master Silent Pro Gold M1000 ::: Antec P280 ::: Noctua NHU12P SE2 ::: ASUS VE247H ::: Logitech G510 ::: Cooler Master Storm Sentinel II ::: Logitech X530 ::: Steelseries Siberia V-2 Black & gold edition

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eire1274
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I'm an all-over kind of guy. My main rigs are Windows based, however I do a lot of work with Linux/Posix and my server base is FreeBSD. I HAD a "Hackintosh" for a bit, but unfortunately I needed the hardware elsewhere. And then this old G4 (back when Macs were actually different and cool) ended up in my lap, so I am refreshing my old photo editing system. However, it's nice to have a rig running to help keep me competent with it in case a Mac comes crusing in (and yes, they do; lots of Mac worms showing up).

Sad to say, but an 800Mhz G4 Mac with 512Mb of memory runs Photoshop CS4 runs WAY quicker here than it did on a 2.5Ghz Pentium 4 with 2Gb of memory running Mac OS. It competes with my dual-core AMD rig running Windows. Why in the world did Mac ditch the PowerPC architecture?

Nick McDermott

spawnkiller
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yeah the "MAC" architecture was way better than intel or AMD in that time

eire1274
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I wouldn't say that it was better than Intel or AMD, but given the way Mac's were designed and designated, the RISC architecture of the PowerPC design fit the software scope brilliantly. Photo editing, visual effects, DTP, and even video production all deal with lots of number crunching on a simpler mathmatical basis, which RISC cores excel at.

However, it was a lot more expensive to produce a chip design that very few other companies shared in (IBM being the largest partner, who quit PowerPC designs years before Apple) as well as the complementary architecture in the motherboards and other parts that were PURELY Apple. Now, just contract the Worker Killer (Foxcon) to build you cheap Intel boards and pretty them up on the outside. Imagine a quad-core PowerPC G6 (which was in development) running at 2.5Ghz, that bugger would SCREAM for video editing.

Another technology that has pretty much been retired... aside from the fact that our Blu-ray players, TVs, video game rigs all still run RISC CPUs.

Nick McDermott