Thermal paste application method

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Lamethrower
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Hey guys,

I just built a new system and I have a Noctua NH-D14 to lay down on a i7 950

What would be the best method and volume to apply the thermal paste? I hear the center dot method is fine but it can sometimes not cover all the cores.
I will be overclocking and want to get the best cooling results. Any tips would be a great help.

Thanks

Current Rig:
i7 950 @ 4GHz w Noctua D-14 Cooler | Gigabyte UD3R Rev 2 Mobo | Kingston 6GB GDDR3 Tri Chan ValueRAM | 2x Gigabyte GTX 560 Ti OC | 2x WD Caviar Black Raid 0 | Antec Earthwatts 750w PSU | Antec DF-10 |

ihatenvidia
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well 2 to 3 bb pellet sized drop would be good enough, spread it using a card. Don't put too much, less is better. My favorite thermal compound is gelid gc extreme.

z33k3r
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All you need is a less-than-pea size dot on the CPU die remembering that your goal is not to slab it on, but to simply fill in the micro air gaps between the die and the heat sink.

My preferred method is using my finger (preferably in a powder-less latex glove if possible) and just swirl it around until you get complete coverage. If it's not absolutely perfect, that's fine. The reason being is that as long as you don't have gaping dry areas, the pressure from the heat sink and the heat will cure it to cover those little streaks etc.

When placing the heat sink on the CPU, give it a little twist back and forth to fill in any air gaps on the surface of the heat sink. Attach brackets etc and you're golden. Always do burn-ins before taking any temps your going to make decisions by and have fun :)

Side note: GooGone makes great thermal paste remover! Preferred thermal pastes are Arctic Silver Céramique if you're into the white creamy stuff, Tuniq TX-2 is good, along with Arctic Silver 5.

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Lamethrower
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Thanks for the feedback guys

For now I've just used the paste that noctua provides but I'll probably put some Arctic Silver if I can find anywhere that sells it. I'm idling at around 40c given that my rooms ambient temp is rather high since it's still summer here probably around 28-32c at any given time. Seems reasonable to me.

Hopefully with some extra case fans to get better air flow things should work out pretty well. I don't plan to go over 4ghz for most part but maybe a little more in the winter months.

andydviking
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The paste that Noctua provides is a really good compound. I wouldn't buy arctic silver. I would apply the paste per Noctua's recommendations and put a small drop in the center of the CPU. It'll show you in Noctua's directions. http://noctua.at/pdf/manuals/noctua_nh_d14_manual_en.pdf

.

z33k3r
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I actually have a D14 sitting in the box. It's a huge mofo! But one thing I noticed was that it had a higher idle temperature than my other Noctua stuff (currently C14). But on the higher end would keep the max temps down... Another thing is that it's using a low CFM fan to reduce noise, so you could always upgrade and get better temps. The affect the paste has on the temps will change over time as it cures.

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Lamethrower
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I've been doing some overclocking and was able to get a stable clock of about 4GHz @ 1.25v. Idles around 45c and maxes out under load at around 75c.
I will probably make my case air flow more efficient so I can push it to 4.2GHz or perhaps even higher in the future.

z33k3r
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Yeah that D14 restricts a lot of air flow, of what it's not using to push through the heat sink. Make sure to have enough ventilation CFM behind the D14 as well. A fan that pushes at least 10% more air than the D14. This will avoid hot air coming back into the case.

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frankiespanky
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Kedren Aderac
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Whatever you do, just remember that don't ever spread the compound your self, NEVER. :) , let the heatsink do it. Personally I use the "high 5" or the basic "pea".

Manic Mouse
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For hdt heatsinks, I put a thin line about the size of a grain of basmati rice along the contact center point of each copper heatpipe in the base of the heatsink. None on the CPU itself.

For low viscosity (more liquidy like AS5, TX2 or Coolermaster Freeze) compounds, I put a spot the size of a lentil in the dead center of the CPU heat spreader.

For high viscosity compounds (those thicker than toothpaste - thinking of compounds like IC Diamond 7 Carat stuff which is super heavy) I spread a very thin coating using a single-edge razor blade. I spread it just thick enough that I can't see the CPU through it and no more.

Mark Baker

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eire1274
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I've always been a guy who uses a little extra. But the thermal compounds I use are zero conduction, so I'm not worried about frying something important by mistake. I work much like Manic Mouse, but I will hit the CPU facing with a thin layer, as well as the contact layer on the heatsink. As I mount it, make sure to lay one side down first (can be difficult depending on mounting arrangements, but you can do it) and then lever it down to flat, forcing the air out uniformly. Almost never see trapped air that way.

There are a million ways to "do it right" so don't panic. The rules are a) great contact with no air gaps between CPU and heatsink, and b) no conductive material intruding onto circuit paths. If you can accomplish this, you'll be fine.

Nick McDermott

RGNDRUNKJUMPY@g...
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on the 1055t amd cpu whats temps do you guys get with this Tuniq TX-4 Extreme Performance and Exceptional Reliability Thermal Compound

3dGameMan
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Rodney Reynolds,
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you did not answer my question
on the 1055t amd cpu whats temps do you guys get with this Tuniq TX-4 Extreme Performance and Exceptional Reliability Thermal Compound

limeDk
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i got a 1100T with a H70 with the stock Thermal Paste which is a really nice paste and i get idle temp on 34C

tzaar0723
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Kedren Aderac wrote:Whatever you do, just remember that don't ever spread the compound your self, NEVER. :) , let the heatsink do it. Personally I use the "high 5" or the basic "pea".

This is the way I do it as well. A small pea-sized bit in the middle of the CPU heatspreader, then use the HSF/waterblock to press it & spread it.

To the person that uses their finger -- not the best idea, as you'll get oils & dead skin cells from your finger mixed in with the TIM.

Johnbrianr
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I used my finger to spread it out but I had a rubber glove on. Worked pretty well, actually.

Creepypig
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Just apply some in the center, then take a plastic bag and put your finger in and spread it with that all over the CPU. Make sure you don't spill anything over the edges.