How does Intel lock their cpus?

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thedarkfade
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Hey everybody,

Recently, I bought a new cpu, i5-3570, which isn't a "K" cpu. Sadly I thought I could overclock it as high as I want, since I did not make enough researches before I purchased it.

So now I am curious about what makes the K and non-k cpu so different, more specifically , how intel lock/ unlock their cpus.

Also, does anyone know the detail structures of the cpus that intel make?

I know these question are almost impossible to answer but I am trying my luck here. Thanks a lot.

My Build:
Case: Xigmatek Asgard Pro Black Edition Motherboard: AsRock Z77 Extreme 4
CPU: Intel 3rd Generation i5-3570 @ 4.2 Ghz Graphics Card: Asus HD 7770 1 GB GDDR5
RAM: Adata 4GB DDR3 1333 X 2

Razear
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The clock multiplier on 'k' series Intel CPUs are unlocked which allow maximum overclocking. Non 'k' series CPUs have the ability to only change the turbo-mode multiplier which only allows for slightly higher overclocking. 'k' series CPUs also have better on-chip graphics.

spawnkiller
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yeah, all "Core" CPU have a base clock that doesn't go really high but the multiplier of this base clock will determine the speed of the CPU so if it's unlock then the CPU clock is only limited by the chip itself...

On a non-k CPU you can only change the base clock to overclock so i think you'll not going really more than 10-20% overclock if you have a really good mobo/chipset/ram...

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thedarkfade
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Thanks a lot for the comments, I do know the difference between the K and non-k cpus, but what I am concerning is if I can do anything to unlock a non-k cpu's multiplier. I have read articles that someone have done similar thing to AMD cpus back in a while, and I am curious if someone have did the same thing to Intel cpus.

I did overclock my cpu a bit, by turning up the multiplier to 42 (that's the highest I can set), rising the speed to 4.2 ghz when only one core is active, and 4.0 ghz for all cores when all are active.

I tried to raise the BCLK to overclock the cpu, but the computer won't boot normally, which is to reboot the computer several times, and end up asking me if I would like to continue booting up Windows, I chose yes and Windows boot up as if there is nothing special at all.

I was expecting too see the bus speed to change in CPU-Z, however it didn't.

But I guess I will just open up a new post for that.

After all, my question is:
Is there anyone successfully tried to unlock Intel's NON-K cpus and overclock them?

Thanks a lot. Although I know I might seems like a stupid guy asking dumb questions.

spawnkiller
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Like i said, the only way i know is by the base clock and the multiplier, you should set a stable base clock before raising your multiplier to ensure motherboard/ram compatibility, then raise your multiplier to serve a better overclock... (also don't forget to downclock ram to a lowest strap cause when you will raise the base clock, the ram will raise with it and eventually reach it's labelled speed even if it's at a lowest strap...)

Prophet4NO1
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spawnkiller wrote:Like i said, the only way i know is by the base clock and the multiplier, you should set a stable base clock before raising your multiplier to ensure motherboard/ram compatibility, then raise your multiplier to serve a better overclock... (also don't forget to downclock ram to a lowest strap cause when you will raise the base clock, the ram will raise with it and eventually reach it's labelled speed even if it's at a lowest strap...)

Non of this matters with SB or IB CPU's. In fact you do NOT touch the base clock on SB or IB unless you are going for extreme OC. Even then you can only go up to around 101-103 in most cases. When you crank the base clock you are overclocking EVERYTHING on the mobo. RAM, SATA, PCIe lanes, everything. This makes drive unstable and can jack up video cards. If you do not have an unlocked CPU, don't even bother with SB or IB. It's not like the old days. Also RAM has little to no effect on OC with SB and IB. You can have a 5Ghz CPU with 1333 with crap timings or top of the line 3000mhz ram with super tight timings. The chip will clock the same. Only bench numbers will be effected.

I currently have a 5.1Ghz capable 2600K system. I can push a tad higher but temps and stability are not there.

Prophet4NO1
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You can not unlock them. They are laser cut so they have the unlock function permanently disabled. They do this on chips that did not BIN high enough to be an unlocked chip. Overclocking ability is not a guarantee, but if the chips are unstable much beyond the stock speeds, they wont be sold as a K. The laser cut the die and disable that function and sell the chip as a lesser unit.

thedarkfade
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Thanks for your quick reply, but I think I won't touch this current cpu anymore, at least not that soon, as I am able to archive what I wanna do by now, although I am not 100% satisfied. Bet I will get a Xeon in the future, since I use the computer for rendering out 3d models. I think I will open a new topic for that.

Thanks a lot, dude.

Prophet4NO1
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Zeons can not be overclocked anymore. So, if you plan to OC avoid them. In reality, a workstation motherboard and a i7 will work great for rendering.

thedarkfade
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@ Prophet4NO1

Oh, a new knowledge to me, thanks a lot.

thedarkfade
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@ Prophet4No1

So you pushed a 2600k to 5.1 ghz? I think that is amazing, but what cooling are you using, I am currently using the intel stock cooling :(

thedarkfade
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Prophet4NO1 wrote:Zeons can not be overclocked anymore. So, if you plan to OC avoid them. In reality, a workstation motherboard and a i7 will work great for rendering.

Are you sure sure that Xeons can not be overclocked? If that's the truth, then it would be such a pity. But I think I saw some of the Xeons can be turbo boosted to 4.1 ghz. (I know this is not really overclocking)

Also, what are the differences between workstation motherboards and the normal ones? Is there an advantage with it? Which one will you suggest?

If I shall use a i7 cpu, then should it be the 2nd Gen. 3930K or the 3rd Gen. 3770K? (I won't go to extreme)

I know the 3770K has a IGPU whereas 3930K don't have one, but I have a graphics card which I think can deal with the graphics issues. Also the 3930K have more cores and threads, I think I will benefit from this, since I will use my computer to do rendering tasks.

Prophet4NO1
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The old CPU's could. But the current crop of E5 and E7 chips are locked. You can try fiddling with base clocks, that's it. You really don't get much out of them so no real point.

As for the cooling on my 2600K, H100 with Scythe fans. It just barely has the ability to do 5.1 on my chip. In reality, it needs a proper water cooling system. And I am working on that. Have a pump and rad sitting here. Need to order fittings, tubes, and a block.