Possible cpu problem... or something else?

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Scabe
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Joined: 07/18/2012
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I received computer parts today and began building. Everything went smoothly until when i installed the cpu heatsink. I got some resistance when putting the locking mechanism onto the part on the motherboard so i loosed the motherboard part to be able to fit the cooler. When i eventually started up the computer the cpu fan seemed to be accelerating very fast and windows 7 wouldn't boot. When i went into the bios it says cpu temp was going up to 57c before i turned it back off. I'm using a hdd from my laptop with drivers for motherboard/gpu installed from the laptop. Basically when it gets to "Windows is starting up" It stops and restarts 2 seconds in. Whats the problem? Is it the cpu? I also removed the heatsink and cpu and put it back in with no change.

Amd 8120 cpu + msi 990FX-GD65 v2 motherboard + msi hd 7850 + rosewill 530w green series

everything default; cpu voltage 1.33-1.4

david179057
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are you using the stock heatsink? seems like the cpu is over heating.

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Razz0r
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Did you put thermal paste on the cpu? I don't see the reason why that cpu will go to that high temperature even if your pc didn't boot up yet , there is a cooling problem, thermal paste or you did't mount your heatsink good.

Scabe
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Its the stock heatsink that already had the paste applied. And even if it was heating up fast it starts at below 50c and still doesn't start windows.

Razz0r
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Had you had problems when you installed the windows?

Scabe
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No. I'm using my laptop hard drive. That already had windows on it.

Razz0r
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That is the problem , the windows must be installed on your current desktop pc, not on your laptop or any other computer, if you reinstall the windows it sould work.

Manic Mouse
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Razz0r wrote:That is the problem , the windows must be installed on your current desktop pc, not on your laptop or any other computer, if you reinstall the windows it sould work.

Seriously? What does the OP using his laptop drive to boot have to do with his CPU temperature in BIOS? Can you please explain?

@Scabe:

If your laptop drive eventually boots to the desktop without blue screens, you should be ok with that laptop drive. Just plan to set up all your drivers and re-activate for the new hardware platform.

Cooling issue:

AMD CPUs are not the coolest-running chips. They get pretty hot and that is normal, but 57c may be a smidge bit high on idle. I would expect to see that under full load non-overclocked. The chip can easily run up to 100c without damage and it will throttle itself down before that happens.

It appears from your description that your heatsink may be mounted poorly. Unplug the PC and take the heatsink off. Is the heatsink compound spread evenly across your CPU and heatsink bottom? If not re-mount the heatsink again (Make sure to clean off the old compound and apply the compound to the CPU top). This time pay very close attention to the mating between the cpu and the some new compound. Use good quality heat sink compund - don't use toothpaste. Also make sure the heatsink fan is plugged in to the CPU fan header of the motherboard. As you tighten down the heatsink, waqtch to make syre the area around it is free of obstacles that could interfere with proper seating (i.e. memory for the really big coolers).

If you find your cooler interferes with other motherboard features (i.e. a really big cooler's heatpipes hitting memory or other heatsink), see what you can do to either move the obstruction or re-orient the cooler. If none of that is possible you may need to buy a different, more compatible cooler.

Another thing to remember is that temperatures will go a bit higher when viewed in BIOS than when when you are running a properly-configured Windows. Windows provides low-level drivers that will control the clock of the CPU allowing it to cool. The bios will run the CPU at full speed for at least one core - this will make the temperature appear higher in bios.

If you run Windows from that laptop drive, be aware that windows will want to re-configure itself to the new computer. You will need to have all the drivers on hand and a USB-based mouse & keyboard may not work in Windows until you manage to get the USB drivers installed. I would not suggest putting that laptop drive back in a laptop after all that. Windows will of course need to re-activate on the new hardware.

Hope that helps.

Mark Baker

Asus P9X79 Deluxe, Intel i7 3930K @4.5Ghz, 64gb G.Skill RipjawsZ 10-10-10-30 PC3-12800, Sapphire HD 7950 3GB, OCZ Vertex 4, Vertex 3, Intel 510 & Adata SSDs, wrapped in a CoolerMaster HAF XM case