Need Tech Support/Help

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universes
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So my computer one day decided to just freeze up and give up on me...

Here are the specs before I explain:
Core 2 Duo E7200 @ 2.53GHz
OCZ Platium DDR2 PC6400 4-4-4-15 @ 2.1V
Asus P5N-E SLI 650i
PNY geForce 9800GT 1GB
1TB Seagate barracuda
600w Cooler Master extreme power (RP-600-PCAR)
Windows 7 Ultimate 32bit

In short, what appears to be the graphics, is screwed up.
When the computer froze, colours were different. Now when I boot up the computer, right when I get to the POST screen, there are white broken lines across the whole screen. On the windows loading screen, the black parts have blue pixels across the whole screen. Finally, in windows, the resolution is down to 800x600. Device manager shows that my graphics card has a problem - "Windows has stopped this device because it has reported problems. (code 43)"
I have tried stopping the device (the graphics card) and re-enabling it. However, my computer eventually freezes again and goes back into the state described above.
I have also tried using other CPU, motherboard, RAM, graphics card, and PSU to no prevail.

So is this a hardware or software problem?

Thanks in advance.

Razear
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According to Microsoft, Code 43 indicates that the driver is telling Windows that the device failed in some way. If you have tried updating to the latest driver, then I suspect it is likely a hardware issue.

TheRealMan
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When windows shows codes like this, it is not really helpful. My question is do you often clean your computer out regularly? the heatsink style that this card uses is very prone to clogging so you must clean it out regularly. Check that all connections to the video card to rule out the simple issues, DVI cable, PCI-E power cable and that the card is snug in the slot. Unfortunately if it is a heat issue, you may have cooked the card already.

Let me know what you find and ill try to help you further,

TRM

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eire1274
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TheRealMan wrote:When windows shows codes like this, it is not really helpful.

I totally disagree. My only complaint is that Windows isn't telling you anything except a number, and it would be nice if it fed you an actual description without you needing to search through the web to find out what the error means.

What we have here is a hardware issue, or an issue with a hardware section (the video card), so we know that it relates either to a) the driver for the hardware, or b) the hardware itself.

Now, given that we are seeing errors in the POST, we know it isn't the driver, because we won't see that until well into the Windows boot.

What my diagnosis is, you overheated. Badly. And the temperature from the GPU either burned an operational transfer, or the memory. Likely, memory isn't the case because text rendering operates in the first 64kb of memory on the card, and with modern density the chance of burning a few bits on a chip holding 128Mb or more to effect text rendering is one in a billion. If the system consistently behaves this way even after fully cooling off, then you have burned the GPU and it cannot be saved. RMA the card (if it is under warranty), or replace it, and examine your cooling situation well before you install the replacement.

Nick McDermott - 3dGM Admin

TheRealMan
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True, i just meant that it can be lots of reasons as to why it would say this.

universes
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First, thanks for the replies.

eire1274: I would rule out overheating due to what I explain below.

I tried to solve this issue logically.
So first, I wouldn't think that it is a software problem since it happens during POST.
Ok, so it shouldn't be a software problem. But when I switch out everything except the power supply, hard drive, optical drive, and case, I still get the same problem. So to me, that would signal either a software problem, or power delivery.
However, I take my motherboard, CPU, graphics card, RAM, and hard drive and plug in a different power supply. Still have the problem.
I take another blank hard drive, POST screen still has the problem.

I ruled out the possibility of a defective DVI cable since I have a windows error. I assume the hardware can't detect a defective cable (or monitor).

eire1274
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I agree that the issue now is not overheating, as at POST most of the card isn't even seeing power (just enough for simple bitmaps and text), but was caused by overheating previously that burned part of the GPU or memory. Sorry I didn't explain this well, but this is something that I have seen on quite a few 9800GT cards due to the huge amount of heat they produce. In any case where cool air is not delivered sufficiently to the GPU cooler, this can happen as the 9800GT is a rather forceful and dumb chip that will happily cook itself until failure, unless the manufacturer provided a temperature failure device on the card.

More recent nVidia (and AMD) GPUs are a little more aware of their temps and will often kick out long before actual damage is done.

As far as detection of a failed cable or monitor, all you would see is either nothing (bad monitor, or no signal because of bad cable) or Windows might not be able to detect the monitor (DVI/HDMI reports info including model and brand, compliant resolutions, and refresh rates). DVI is smart enough that a "partial connect" of the outbound signal would produce no image, as it's an "all or none" type of smart digital connection.

Nick McDermott - 3dGM Admin

universes
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So are you ruling this problem as overheating? If so, what component?
Because I've switched out the graphics card and motherboard/CPU but still had the same problem. I've tried using my motherboard with a different 9800GT and my 9800GT on another board. I can give it another shot and see.

eire1274
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The most likely candidate is that this is due to heat stressing. The 9800GT is a HOT CHIP and has an issue in overheating PCs that are not properly ventilated. What burned is rather another matter. I would have to be there to find the exact culprit.

You never mentioned that you have a second 9800GT before.

Was this card tested as good on another system?

Was the second motherboard tested good with another video card?

This information is needed to properly diagnose.

Nick McDermott - 3dGM Admin

universes
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The other motherboard and graphics card worked fine before. They are from my cousin's old PC, which he was using no more than a month ago. It's a 750i based board and the graphics card is a XFX 9800GT 512mb.

I only have and use one graphics card. The other one was used to see if the problem was due to the graphics card.

I don't see how a burned out graphics card can be the culprit here since I've tried another. I'll test it again, and also test another graphics card.

eire1274
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Okay, that's what we needed to know here. If swapping to a KNOWN GOOD video card produces the same result, than we are looking at interference being caused by another component, most likely following into an issue with the PCIe controller on the motherboard, or possibly a major power failure on the cable that powers the GPU (this is VERY UNLIKELY as normally you simply won't get a GPU warm-up at all if voltages are below 10V, and 10V-11.5V often work fine until the chip warms up for heavy graphics and crashes the system).

What you need to do is try your card on your cousin's system and see what result you get. This will help us narrow things down.

Nick McDermott - 3dGM Admin

3dGameMan
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Sorry, didn't read all of the above posts. It could be a video card driver issue. Do a clean uninstall of the video card drier(s) and then reboot and install the latest one.

Rodney Reynolds,
Register: http://www.3dgameman.com/user/register

eire1274
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Rodney, the issues happen at POST, too, so it seems to be a bad part. We are trying to see if it is the PCIe bus on the board, or the card itself at this point.

Nick McDermott - 3dGM Admin

universes
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Woooo...holidays. So I finally got around to do some more testing.

I tried my cousin's 9800GT and the problem occurs. Tried using both PCI-E power cables, no dice either.

I tried an old ATI Radeon 2900XT, that worked and device manager showed no problems.

Lastly, I tried my cousin's new Radeon HD 6850 and again, device manager said the device is working.

Now, the question is: is the 9800GT model the problem, or Nvidia? I would believe it's the former, but my question is why?????

The last thing I can try is switching motherboards.

If it helps, I can post pictures of what my POST screen looks like.

Thanks

Mr-Mechraven
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Ive had this error before,and it is drivers that caused it for me on 4 different machines. Try this >>

Download Driver Sweeper > http://www.guru3d.com/category/driversweeper/

Un-install all video drivers using driver sweeper > reboot > install latest drivers > reboot

The code 43 error can occur due to both hardware & software so either the drivers are corrupt ( hopefully only that an not the card ) or the card/motherboard has damage somewhere ( overheating ? ). Check for signs of damage to the chamfered edge of the graphics pcb where it connects to the PCI slot. Also check and clean with compressed air the PCI slot itself. Ensure your card is as dust free as possible too. Check in BIO's that the PCI frequency is at default and has not been accidently changed.

Try the above driver sweeper fix and see how you go :) good luck !