ATI vs. NVIDIA for gaming rig build

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undeadkingpr
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Ya most people here have an AMD/ATI bent but not too many overt fanboi's. I think at the most Intel+ATI is the best combo to go with but if Nvidia drops prices $20-$30 it would become a tough choice. Plus if the soon gtx 460 can perform well enough and be priced well the market might shift.

As a side note I just noticed bing is offering a 12% discount on compusa and circuitcity+paypal is still doing the 10% off promo for using bill me later.

p.s Why is the compusa website identical to circuit city?

RuffeDK
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I can't understand people who buy Intel rigs with ATi, because Nvidia is too expensive... eh? I lost the point, there, cause Intel is some of the most overpriced **** out there.

I personally, would gladly go for an AMD setup, for HALF the price, as for Intel. And still be able to have at least one or even more Nvidia cards in my setup.

If people go for Intel + ATi for the "budget", it's almost the same as going for AMD + Nvidia. The difference is, though, that Nvidia has the most powerful GPU's out there, with so much software, as I mentioned earlier. So if you are going for gaming, or computing, AMD + Nvidia is the way to go for budget.

Tiv
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Depends. Intel does cost more, but we have to face the truth here that Intel is the top dog of processors. I see AMD is starting to come back with their X4 and X6's line but still a little behind the curve. I've built plenty of AMD and Intel rigs with each holding their own in games. For a budget build the X4 or the i5-750, i7-920 works well. AMD/ATI still holds the DX11 budget card arena. I'd love to have a DX11 to play BFBC2 and finally see smooth shadows. 

dustyschaffner
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i would go for ATI/AMD because right now ATI is still leading in power from the 5970 and its alot easier to set up eyefinity with ATI because you can connect all the monitors to one card

undeadkingpr
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Amd for half the price? that is AMD fanboi'sm. I can get a 930 for $200 that DOMINATES a 965 or x6 in EVERYTHING. Gaming, encoding, etc. the Intel wins hands down. As for motherboards the difference is around $100 but you get tripple channel ram and a higher quality board (33% thicker pcb). For around $100 more you end up with a far better combination that is more futureproof and has better performance.

Nvidia does NOT have the advantage right now. A 470 performs barely better than a 5850 while being $50 more. A 480 wins and loses to a 5870 which is $100 cheaper. The most powerful card on the market is a 5970-not a 480. Also to get DX11 which may actually mean something in 6 months-1 year you can get a 5750 or 70 for $120-$180 while nvidia's cheapest is $350. Both the 470+480 are HOT and power hungry monsters. Despite shrinking nanometer nvidia failed to drop either of these. The only advantage Nvidia has is the 400's are FAR better with TONS of AA and AF and have physx. Oh, and EVGA makes them.

Salavat23
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Tiv wrote:

RuffeDK wrote:

Oh, and in fact I should be able to run 2x 470's in my system. Maybe i have a 700W quad-rail PSU, but i actually has 20A on each rail, which is quite impressive for a high-end PSU.

You will not be able to use two 470's with a 700watt PSU and that's a fact. Do a search on Google search and you will see spikes of 730 ~ 800 watts just for the two cards, then there is the system, drives, fans and ect..

And again, Chill out on the cussing! Last warning.

Not true. Antec recently demonstrated their Antec New 750W (pretty cheap unit) running 2 GTX 480s and a Core i7 perfectly smoothly throughout a slew of benchmarks.

Looks like we're back in 2008 when people kept overestimating power supply usage. You can safely run 2 5870's and a Core i7 on a solid 550W PSU.

Tiv
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Salavat23 wrote:

Tiv wrote:

RuffeDK wrote:

Oh, and in fact I should be able to run 2x 470's in my system. Maybe i have a 700W quad-rail PSU, but i actually has 20A on each rail, which is quite impressive for a high-end PSU.

You will not be able to use two 470's with a 700watt PSU and that's a fact. Do a search on Google search and you will see spikes of 730 ~ 800 watts just for the two cards, then there is the system, drives, fans and ect..

And again, Chill out on the cussing! Last warning.

Not true. Antec recently demonstrated their Antec New 750W (pretty cheap unit) running 2 GTX 480s and a Core i7 perfectly smoothly throughout a slew of benchmarks.

Looks like we're back in 2008 when people kept overestimating power supply usage. You can safely run 2 5870's and a Core i7 on a solid 550W PSU.

Very True. Okay 50/50, It depends on the hardware. I'd rather overestimate than underestimate on power. Even the 5870's have a range of power needs. Take the HIS drum style coolers that suck up a lot of power to sound like a hair dryer and deliver those overclocked speeds.

Salavat23
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GTX 470 = 225W TDP x 2 = 450W (Theoretical Max)

Core i7 8x0 = 95W TDP

HDD/ODD = 8/10W Each (MAX)

RAM = About 5 watts per 1.5V stick, 4 modules = 20W

Fans/board/miscellaneous = <40W

You're looking at under 630W of power that you will need at PEAK, a scenario that will never happen. When will you be using your ODDs, HDDs, RAM, CPU, and GPUs at their limit all at the same time? It's pretty safe to say never.

With such a rig, you'd be looking at about 500W-550W (with about 80-85% PSU efficiency) of power usage during regular gaming, as the CPU is generally not too stressed at this time.

With the 5870s, each card has a TDP that is 37W less than the GTX 470. With two cards, you're saving yourself 72W.

Tiv
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Does miscellaneous include usb hub, use printer, usb headphones, fan controller, led and cathode neon lights, spot fans, chipset cooler, water cooling for the CPU, water cooling for the video card, external backup drives, raid controller cards, usb 3.0 cards, SATA 6GB/s cards, audio cards, TV tuner cards, blue tooth adapters, finger print scanner, credit card reader and your ipod? lol I can crash those cheap power supplies easy. By all means Sir, please use a 600 watt PSU with seven to eight hundred dollars in video cards if you want. If it works it works, but if it does not, well then you know best.

Salavat23
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Tiv wrote:

Does miscellaneous include usb hub, use printer, usb headphones, fan controller, led and cathode neon lights, spot fans, chipset cooler, water cooling for the CPU, water cooling for the video card, external backup drives, raid controller cards, usb 3.0 cards, SATA 6GB/s cards, audio cards, TV tuner cards, blue tooth adapters, finger print scanner, credit card reader and your ipod? lol I can crash those cheap power supplies easy. By all means Sir, please use a 600 watt PSU with seven to eight hundred dollars in video cards if you want. If it works it works, but if it does not, well then you know best.

You have all of those things attached, running at 100% power all the time?

BTW, 8"x11"+ printers use AC power. LED lights use next to nothing. The wide majority of chipset coolers are passive.

You can log the power consumption of such a rig, and you'll still see that in gaming, it won't surpass 500-550W.

Tiv
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Well yeah, Dude I'm a Geek! But even I don't use more than 600W myself. I don't have anything that is passive unless a keyboard counts. Even the mouse is using extra power to support the 500Hz speed.

Just keeping things real here, maybe 1000W or higher is a bit much for even a SLI system, but it can't hurt anything having a little extra leg room in a highend system. That's all I'm really trying to say here. If a high quality 600 from Corsair works then that's awesome. There really is a big difference in quality from all the types of power supplies that are out there. That's normally one area I try not to go cheap on regardless of the watts.

Getting back on topic, if Nvidia is 70W more then that does mean some people might need to upgrade the power supply as well. However my thoughts are that if their 700W PSU could not handle that load then it was not a high quality PSU to start with. I guess that's why it's easier just to tell people higher watt numbers to help smooth out unwanted fluctuations found in the many brands of PSU's in the market.