420watts going on 1000

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aznwarrior
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My PC uses about 420 watts. If I put a 1000w psu in it, is there anything that can go wrong. Wud I be using more power and need to pay more bills? or is it the same if I use a lower wattage?

3dGameMan
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Hey bud, I've actually already answered this:

Rodney Reynolds,
Register: http://www.3dgameman.com/user/register

aznwarrior
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Oh sorry. Thanks a lot Rodney, you the best!!!

eire1274
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The biggest thing to keep in mind is that greater surplus means greater wear on the power supply components. 420W load on 1000W creates a 58% surplus, as in 58 percent of the system's generation is recycled back into the inverter. This creates greater heat and wear on the electrical handling systems.

Most power supplies are designed to be within the 20% bracket, where heat and load in handling extra power can be tolerated by the power supply easily. Better power supplies with power factor correction (PFC) and/or EMI protection systems tend to deal with surplus power better, and can often survive much higher gaps than 20%. However, remember that avoiding huge gaps (as in 1000W supply on 750W load would be my limit) will help your power supply live longer.

For 420W, a good power supply with PFC would be between 500W and 550W safely, and I would not exceed 600W.

Remember that early death due to excessive inverter usage is covered by the manufacturer's warranty, and you still would be able to get a repair or RMA if it happens.

Nick McDermott

Earnhardt
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eire1274 wrote:The biggest thing to keep in mind is that greater surplus means greater wear on the power supply components. 420W load on 1000W creates a 58% surplus, as in 58 percent of the system's generation is recycled back into the inverter. This creates greater heat and wear on the electrical handling systems.

Most power supplies are designed to be within the 20% bracket, where heat and load in handling extra power can be tolerated by the power supply easily. Better power supplies with power factor correction (PFC) and/or EMI protection systems tend to deal with surplus power better, and can often survive much higher gaps than 20%. However, remember that avoiding huge gaps (as in 1000W supply on 750W load would be my limit) will help your power supply live longer.

For 420W, a good power supply with PFC would be between 500W and 550W safely, and I would not exceed 600W.

Remember that early death due to excessive inverter usage is covered by the manufacturer's warranty, and you still would be able to get a repair or RMA if it happens.

Well i think this is rubbish!

pcpower and cooling:

If I were to upgrade to a higher-wattage power supply, will it hurt my system?
Absolutely not. Your computer will only draw the amount of power it needs. The extra capacity of a higher-wattage unit will improve the power supply's operating range, regulation, hold time, ripple, cooling, and MTBF.

aznwarrior
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Wow i'm confused right now, i dont know wat to say... HELP... Any thoughts rodney?

caspeer_costel
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What eire1274 says is true. That does happen but it doesn't happen quite often. You can buy a more powerful power supply and use it as wish but what he said is true. My opinion is that you won't have any problems with buying a more powerful one. I myself have a ~300W extra, left on my power source. But you never know when I'll start adding some more hardware so it's nice to have some extra power there :)

aznwarrior
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Thanks for your help.

eire1274
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I wasn't intending to scare you off, but wanted to give you a warning that this does effect the lifespan of a critical component of your rig.

If this wasn't an issue, manufacturers would just make one size.

However, most GOOD QUALITY PSUs fail internally with self-cutoffs so there will be no loss of other hardware. I recently had a 6-year-old OCZ die, but with no hardware loss. So if you are looking at having lots of extra power for additional upgrading, don't hesitate and buy what you need!

Nick McDermott

aznwarrior
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Thanks for the help. You didn't scare me off, i just got a bit confused.

Cheers mate.

Earnhardt
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eire1274 wrote:If this wasn't an issue, manufacturers would just make one size.

quote]

they dont make one size due to price,no other reason.

eire1274
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Earnhardt wrote: they dont make one size due to price,no other reason.

I would ask you to talk to folks from OCZ, Corsair, or Seasonic (Antec) on that. They very much disagree, and have all said that close matching of power in to power out results in longer system lives, and if this wasn't such a factor we would still be in the old days where EVERY POWER SUPPLY produced 180W whether it was a desktop or server. There was a lot of engineering going in to make our machines last longer when we started to see these different wattage choices entering the market.

Nick McDermott